Blogs

Holly Hovan's picture
fistula management

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A fistula is an abnormal opening between two areas that typically shouldn't be connected, or with an epithelialized tract. An example is an opening from the bowel to the abdominal wall, termed enteroatmospheric or enterocutaneous (the terms are sometimes used interchangeably) because this fistula is exposed to the atmosphere, or is open from the abdomen to the skin, and typically needs to be pouched or some type of containment of the effluent.

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Martin Vera's picture
sickle cell anemia testing - atypical wound etiology assessment

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

Part 1 in a series discussing the etiology, assessment and management of atypical wounds.

As devoted clinicians to the field of wound management we take a responsibility to educate ourselves and others about wound etiologies and characteristics, as well as management of barriers to achieve positive outcomes. We spend a great deal of our careers learning about the most common offenders, such as pressure injuries, diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, arterial wounds, amputations, and traumatic wounds, to name a few. However, as our careers unfold we are faced with extra challenges, and atypical wounds are among them.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

It has long been known in clinical practice that long-term exposure of the skin to moisture is harmful and can lead to extensive skin breakdown. The term moisture-associated skin damage was coined as an umbrella term to describe the spectrum of skin damage that can occur over time and under various circumstances. To have a moisture-associated skin condition, there must be moisture that comes in contact with that skin.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
incontinence-associate dermatitis prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Although clinical practice is hampered by a lack of rigorous studies, standardized terminology, or definitions of incontinence-associated skin damage, it is well known among health care providers that this damage places patients at increased risk for pressure ulcer/injury development.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
complications associated with MASD

by the WoundSource Editors

Best practice in skin care focuses on the prevention of skin breakdown and the treatment of persons with altered skin integrity. When we ask what causes skin damage we should consider the conditions that can harm the skin, including excessive moisture and overhydration, altered pH of the skin, the presence of fecal enzymes and pathogens, and characteristics of incontinence such as the volume and frequency of the output and whether the output is urine, feces, or both

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
skin assessment and moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

The performance of an accurate and complete skin assessment is of utmost importance to obtaining and maintaining healthy skin. Understanding the structure and function of the skin is key to the differentiation of normal from abnormal findings. Having this baseline knowledge aids in determining the patient's level of risk, how skin is damaged, the impact of moisture on the skin, the resulting type of moisture-associated skin damage (MASD), and whether current skin care protocols are effective and adequate.

Hy-Tape International's picture
wound dressing securement - infection prevention

by Hy-Tape International

To promote rapid healing, improve patient comfort, and prevent complications, it is important that health care professionals actively work to prevent infection. One key component of that effort is wound dressing securement. Secure, gentle, and effective dressings can help prevent the ingress of foreign material, reduce damage during dressing changes, and help foster an ideal healing environment. This can help reduce the risk of infection, thereby improving patient outcomes and lowering costs. In this post, we explore the importance of infection prevention and effective dressing securement strategies to help prevent infection.

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Diane Krasner's picture
wound care documentation

By Diane L. Krasner, PhD, RN, FAAN

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

A major concern in managing patients with diabetes is their susceptibility to acquiring ulcers in their feet. If these patients are not careful, these ulcers may become infected and eventually lead to additional sequelae, ending in lower extremity amputation. The focus of this study was to determine the major factors of lower extremity amputation in the diabetic foot, in hopes that clinicians may be able to reduce the rate of amputations more effectively.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
lymphedema management and prevention

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CS, CLT-LANA

With increased awareness of the impact of the lymphatic system on all other systems of the body, there are now multitudes of research studies on lymphedema and thus new approaches and treatments by the medical profession. These include medications, prevention, detection, surgery, and regeneration. Despite cursory education on the lymphatics in medical school, research in the United States and elsewhere has managed to progress treatment.

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