Blogs

Thomas Serena's picture
hyperbaric oxygen therapy

by Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

In 1950, J. Edgar Hoover published the first edition of the FBI’s most wanted list. Since that time, no less than 512 fugitives have been featured. Many surrendered after learning that their mug shots were hanging on every post office wall in the country. In medicine, we have an equally infamous public posting: The Office of Inspector General’s (OIG) work list. In 2017, it turns out that hyperbaric medicine services are "public enemy number one." But please, do not surrender just yet.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

Wound healing occurs in four phases: hemostasis, inflammation, tissue growth, and tissue remodeling. The process of wound healing can be affected by multiple factors, including oxygenation, age, stress, and disease such as diabetes. Wound healing in patients with diabetes can be further complicated by neuropathy and vascular disease. Typical treatments for diabetic wounds, like wound dressings, cell therapy, and oxygen therapy, are not entirely successful because diabetes slows and impairs the healing process. The authors of this study propose the use of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma treatment as a novel therapy for diabetic wounds. Unlike conventional methods, this treatment can accelerate tissue repair without negatively affecting normal tissue. Using atmospheric plasma accelerates tissue repair because the plasma produces reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which are key for the inflammatory response. It also induces neovascularization and enhances epidermal layer formation.

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Tissue Analytics's picture
big data analysis for wound treatment

by Matthew Regulski, DPM

One of the most difficult challenges in wound care today is deciding exactly which treatments to use. Due to the high inaccuracy of wound evaluation techniques, specifically ruler measurements, it is extremely difficult to quantify changes in a wound's progress. In addition to the lack of an accurate and objective quality metric for evaluating wounds, modern electronic health records are simply not built to handle analysis of data

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) affect 3% of all people aged 65 years and older. After healing, the recurrence rate can be as high as 69%, making the treatment of VLUs costly to the healthcare system. In Australia alone, VLUs cost the healthcare system $400-500 million per year. VLUs are problematic for patients beyond the physical ulceration of their feet because they create social and psychological challenges. Therefore, treating a VLU entails not only closing the ulcer with full epithelialization, but also taking the correct measures to prevent its recurrence.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Leech Therapy

by Aletha Tippett MD

People from across the country call or email me asking about using leeches for a loved one. Usually, I tell them to try to find someone close to them to administer therapy. Often, the problem is not something a leech could help. I have written about leech therapy before, but maybe it’s time to review how leeches can be used in wound management.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
preventing-surgical-site-infections

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Identifying the presence of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) is an important, basic skill for the wound specialist, and even more essential is understanding how to apply evidence-based, risk-reducing interventions. SSIs are particularly problematic because of the multiple factors contributing to their development, including those that are directly patient-related (modifiable or non-modifiable), and non-patient related (facility, procedure, pre-op, intra-op, and post-op). Due to the multifaceted nature of SSIs, we must address specific issues simultaneously in order to successfully reduce the patient’s risk.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
preventing-pressure-injuries

by Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

As I read through wound care articles on pressure injuries and treatments, I keep going back to one thought: why are they still occurring? They are preventable! Staff are educated, have certifications and equipment, and have been oriented on policy to prevent pressure injuries. I think it comes down to opportunities and choices. A culture of care—bottom to top and back down again—can drastically reduce incidence.

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Margaret Heale's picture
personalized medicine

Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

"Personalized medicine" is apparently a new concept that has evolved from taking good family histories, then adding a genetic testing component. The idea is to help assess the risk of specific traits that may be evident, and confirm with genetic testing so patients can make lifestyle changes that reduce risk. It has attracted a huge amount of attention over the past few years.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
technology-in-wound-care

by Aletha Tippett MD

In looking at technology that helps in wound care, how many know about—and use—lasers? Cold lasers have been used by physical therapists for years, but cosmetic lasers can also be used. I have had tremendous success using laser therapy on wounds. Healing is much improved (and faster), with less scarring. I am not a technocrat. I’m much more old-fashioned, but the laser is a wonder.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
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the-continuum-of-wound-care

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

Have you ever confronted yourself with thoughts on how your role plays into the grand scheme of wound care? I am sure any wound nurse or physician would quickly answer “of course!” – since the role of a direct caregiver is so glaringly obvious. What about behind-the-scenes people contributing to the care of the wounded patient? In wound care, we are all parts of a continuum of care, serving one greater purpose: healing the wounded patient.

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