Blogs

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Great news! Data suggest that surgical site infection (SSI) incidence could be halved with implementation of evidence-based interventions. So, why are interventions not ubiquitously utilized across health care institutions and SSIs not nearly eradicated?

Industry News's picture
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by The Wound Healing Foundation
This update from the Wound Healing Foundation (WHF) provides an overview of current and future educational, research and community-based initiatives in wound care. Recent WHF activities and opportunities include participation in international dialogue and meetings, as well as the ongoing efforts to advance and support scientific research in the field of wound management.

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Fabiola Jimenez's picture
nursing career

By Fabiola Jimenez RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Nursing has given me great opportunities; some of them I never imagined possible. I started as a medical surgical nurse in an oncology unit where the treatment of the day was gauze soaked in Dakin's solution for the management of post-op radical neck surgery. I moved on to intensive care, travel nursing, Army nursing, and endoscopy. It was in endoscopy and working with the colorectal surgeons, who helped me get my clinical experience while pursuing a master's degree in nursing, where I found out that it all could be tied together with a certification in wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC), and a wound care nurse is born!

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Holly Hovan's picture
enteral nutrition feeding

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A common misconception by nurses is sometimes predicting nutritional status based on a resident's weight. Weight is not always a good predictor of nutritional status. Nutritional status is determined by many factors and by looking at the big picture.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
post-surgical cancer patient

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

So, if you are following my series on the lymphatic system, then recall that last month the topic was causes of lymphedema. Today I will dive into how modern medical care and disease processes can affect the lymphatic system.

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Hy-Tape International's picture
elderly patient skin tear prevention

by Hy-Tape International

Skin tears are a major and growing problem for health care professionals, particularly those caring for older patients. By 2060, the population of Americans age 65 or older is projected to grow from approximately 46 million to 98 million and account for 24% of the total population. This makes skin tears an issue of increasing concern, and it is important for those caring for older adults to take steps to prevent the problem.

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Martin Vera's picture
chronic wounds

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

What is a chronic wound? What changes must happen within a wound for clinicians to classify it as "chronic"? Is there a time frame for healing chronic wounds? And what should we clinicians do to prevent and/or reverse chronic wounds? These are all great questions that keep us on our toes, from the dedicated seasoned clinician to the clinicians new to our field. In this blog I will define what a chronic wound is, what it consists of, and whether there is a way to convert or reverse a wound.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
pressure injury risk assessment

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries pose a major risk to patients by increasing morbidity and mortality and causing significant discomfort.1 They are also prevalent, particularly in long-term care facilities, where patient populations may be at higher risk of developing pressure injuries as a result of factors of age, immobility, and comorbidities.2 To reduce the incidence of pressure injuries effectively, nurses and other health care professionals should be aware of the risk factors and the means to evaluate patients. This will allow caregivers to take steps to prevent problems before they develop and treat them more effectively if they do.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
repositioning for pressure injury prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are extremely prevalent, particularly in long-term and other care facilities, and primarily affect older adults, those with cognitive impairment, mobility issues or individuals who are bedfast. Understanding the best ways to prevent skin damage before it develops into a significant injury is critical to improving patient outcomes and reducing costs.1 This brief guide will introduce nurses and other health care professionals to pressure injury prevention best practices to reduce the risk of patients’ developing these preventable wounds.