Blogs

WoundSource Editors's picture

In celebrating the 20th anniversary of WoundSource, we would like to acknowledge the support of our readership. The WoundSource Reader Profile Series shares the stories behind our readers and how WoundSource currently impacts their wound care practices.

Karen Zulkowski, DNS, RN

Wound Course Instructor, Excelsior College
Executive Editor, JWCET
Associate Professor at Montana State University-Bozeman & Wound Care Researcher (Retired)

Ron Sherman's picture
road blocks to maggot debridement therapy

by Ronald Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

Bob Hope and Bing Crosby starred in a series of films called "On the Road" in which the duo traveled around the globe, facing a variety of amusing obstacles and mishaps. Therapists and patients desiring maggot debridement therapy (MDT) for their non-healing wounds often face a variety of obstacles, too... though they may not seem quite as amusing. Let's consider some of these obstacles and examine ways to avoid or mitigate them.

We can organize the most likely obstacles chronologically:

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Janet Wolfson's picture
kidney failure-related edema

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Acute care wound or edema professionals are bombarded with multiple kinds of edema that can be treated in many ways—and with many choices of compression garments. What to choose?

Hy-Tape International's picture
Keywords: 
dressing wound - medical adhesive

by Hy-Tape International

Nurses and other health care professionals often dress dozens of wounds in a single day. Each wound must be appropriately cared for using best practices in order to reduce the risk of infection, discomfort, and other complications. Yet many health care professionals struggle to dress wounds in difficult places, and struggle to ensure the dressing stays secure even when the patient is active. In order to more effectively dress wounds, it is important to adopt best practices for wound care and use better wound dressings and adhesives.

Martin Vera's picture
Arterial Wounds

by Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

As we move forward in our continuation of lower extremity wounds, we will now turn our attention to arterial wounds. In my previous post, we discussed challenges with venous leg ulcers. Lower extremity wounds continue to challenge clinicians on a daily basis. We often refer to them as "the big three" – or how I like to refer to them, "the pesky triplets." It doesn't matter what we call them, we know we are referring to venous leg ulcers, arterial ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. In no way shape or manner will we disregard the many other types of lower extremity wounds we may encounter as wound clinicians, but these three are the most common and often present with treatment challenges.

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Tissue Analytics's picture
wound care assessment system

by Amanda Steinhauser, LVN, WCC

Everyone has heard the numbers; wound care costs in the United States are reported to be in excess of fifty billion dollars annually. Moreover, more than six million Americans suffer from chronic wounds. According to the American Diabetes Association, over one million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. Despite these jaw-dropping statistics, wound care assessment techniques remain, for the majority, one of the most antiquated parts of health care.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Calciphylaxis

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

In patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), there is a decreased renal clearance that causes an increase in phosphorus, then calcium, in the body. Elevation of these two electrolytes causes the parathyroid gland to secrete additional parathyroid hormone to compensate. This, however, leads to increased movement of phosphorus and calcium throughout the body.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
fat grafting for pressure injuries

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

This month's blog topic idea came about from a recent conversation with a middle-aged patient with paraplegia. She had a stage 4 pressure injury due to being in her wheelchair long hours, along with a low BMI. I made the comment, "I wish I could give you a fat transplant." She laughed. She then asked, "Well, why not?" Later that day the topic of fat grafting popped up on social media in a spinal cord injury group I follow. I ended up chatting with a few spinal cord injury folks that were serious about coming up with funds to get fat grafting done. They all had a fear of, or a previous history of pressure injuries. These folks with past pressure injuries had used advanced wound care dressings, support surfaces, high-end cushions, supplements, negative pressure wound therapy, a slew of antibiotics, and even flap closures.

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Holly Hovan's picture
staff education in wound care

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

As I am sure we are all well aware, not everyone loves wounds, ostomies, and continence as much as we do. Some nurses just do not have the passion (or desire) to perform wound care and learn about different modalities. On the other hand, some nurses are so eager to learn, obtain certification, and be the unit-based experts! In my experience, taking a hands-on approach to wound care education has been the most successful in terms of teaching wound assessment and dressing changes/techniques.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS is the Coordinator of Wound Management at Patience Home Health Care in San Antonio, Texas. He has been working in the wound care field for nearly 20 years, helping countless patients, teaching wound care best practices, and improving standards at his care facility. His career has demonstrated an extraordinary passion for patient care, a commitment to doing the right thing, and a strong faith.