Education

WoundSource Editors's picture
Diabetes and wound healing

For individuals with diabetes, all wounds are a serious health concern and require careful attention. Because of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, skin cuts and blisters often go unnoticed until they become more complicated to heal. In addition, internal wounds such as ingrown toenails, skin ulcers, or calluses can cause breakdown of tissue and an increased risk of infection. Even small cuts and insect bites can cause wound healing difficulties in patients with diabetes. Here are common factors of diabetes that impact wound healing:

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Fabiola Jimenez's picture
nursing career

By Fabiola Jimenez RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Nursing has given me great opportunities; some of them I never imagined possible. I started as a medical surgical nurse in an oncology unit where the treatment of the day was gauze soaked in Dakin's solution for the management of post-op radical neck surgery. I moved on to intensive care, travel nursing, Army nursing, and endoscopy. It was in endoscopy and working with the colorectal surgeons, who helped me get my clinical experience while pursuing a master's degree in nursing, where I found out that it all could be tied together with a certification in wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC), and a wound care nurse is born!

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Holly Hovan's picture
enteral nutrition feeding

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A common misconception by nurses is sometimes predicting nutritional status based on a resident's weight. Weight is not always a good predictor of nutritional status. Nutritional status is determined by many factors and by looking at the big picture.

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Holly Hovan's picture
peroperative ostomy siting

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

When marking a patient for a stoma, it is important to consider the practice based on evidence acquired by the WOC nurse during training and experience. Stoma siting procedures are based on evidence-based practices. As Mahoney (2015) discusses, a transparent film dressing, marker, and stoma location disks should be gathered prior to marking the patient.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
Stop Pressure Injuries - Pressure Injury Prevention

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I consider myself to be beyond blessed. I know that my purpose in life is to be useful, compassionate, and to make a difference in wound care… In any capacity I can. I have no problem sharing my mother's story with my patients. I think it shows that I am genuine and compassionate. I do whatever works to help my patients understand the importance of pressure injury prevention and/or treatment. My point is: do whatever works. It is good to think outside of the box!

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
doctor giving patient hope

by Aletha Tippett MD

I have written about so many things over the past years… Maybe now is a good time to announce that I am writing a book called Hear Our Cry, an autobiographical story about 20 years of wound care and limb salvage. The process has had quite an impact on me, reviewing all the pictures and notes from my wound patients from the past two decades.

Catherine Milne's picture
innovation

By Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, BC-ANP, CWOCN-AP

Our New England village has an annual tradition that takes place on the town green. These two acres of well-manicured grass have historically been central to the fabric of the hamlet. Every Memorial Day, members of the fifth grade class assemble on the steps of one of the town's oldest buildings to recite the Gettysburg Address. With parents, grandparents, and residents looking toward the cherub-faced innocents, they deliver, "Fourscore and seven years ago..."

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WoundSource Editors's picture
wound care slide presentation

by Jeanne Cunningham, Founder of WoundSource

After seeing about 100 pictures of wounds, I was beginning to feel sick. The year was 1985 and there I was, a recent college graduate in my 20s, sitting in a cramped office at the Crozer Chester Medical Center in Chester, PA, watching slide after slide of feet, elbows, legs, bottoms, in fact, every part of the human body with open, colorful wounds.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Calciphylaxis

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

In patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), there is a decreased renal clearance that causes an increase in phosphorus, then calcium, in the body. Elevation of these two electrolytes causes the parathyroid gland to secrete additional parathyroid hormone to compensate. This, however, leads to increased movement of phosphorus and calcium throughout the body.

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Holly Hovan's picture
staff education in wound care

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

As I am sure we are all well aware, not everyone loves wounds, ostomies, and continence as much as we do. Some nurses just do not have the passion (or desire) to perform wound care and learn about different modalities. On the other hand, some nurses are so eager to learn, obtain certification, and be the unit-based experts! In my experience, taking a hands-on approach to wound care education has been the most successful in terms of teaching wound assessment and dressing changes/techniques.

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