Literature Review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
literature review

Chronic wounds are clinically defined as wounds that have failed to proceed through a healing process in a timely and biologically efficient manner. They are easily identified due to their presence of a raised, hyperproliferative, and non-advancing wound margin. They often are not responsive to initial therapy, and still continue to exist even with adequate wound treatment and sharp debridement.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
literature review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Keloids are fibrous lesions made of collagen types I and III that arise from an area of wound healing, outside the margins of the original wound and are an unfortunate consequence of irregular wound healing. Treating keloids is difficult because there is limited understanding on why they arise, which is why many treatments fail to prevent their recurrence. It has been shown that no single treatment modality is effective to treat keloids; therefore, a multifaceted approach must be taken to lower recurrence rates.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
literature review

Diabetic foot ulcers often present in patients with diabetes mellitus, and are a serious and challenging complication that often requires time and costly procedures to treat. Diabetic foot ulcers are very difficult to heal and often become chronic, which increases the incidence of progressing to infection. The goal of diabetic foot ulcer management is to promote reepithelization of ulcerative areas, as well as address deficits of the ulcer such as necrotic tissue, inadequate perfusion, and inflammation.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

Wound healing occurs in four phases: hemostasis, inflammation, tissue growth, and tissue remodeling. The process of wound healing can be affected by multiple factors, including oxygenation, age, stress, and disease such as diabetes. Wound healing in patients with diabetes can be further complicated by neuropathy and vascular disease. Typical treatments for diabetic wounds, like wound dressings, cell therapy, and oxygen therapy, are not entirely successful because diabetes slows and impairs the healing process. The authors of this study propose the use of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma treatment as a novel therapy for diabetic wounds. Unlike conventional methods, this treatment can accelerate tissue repair without negatively affecting normal tissue. Using atmospheric plasma accelerates tissue repair because the plasma produces reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which are key for the inflammatory response. It also induces neovascularization and enhances epidermal layer formation.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) affect 3% of all people aged 65 years and older. After healing, the recurrence rate can be as high as 69%, making the treatment of VLUs costly to the healthcare system. In Australia alone, VLUs cost the healthcare system $400-500 million per year. VLUs are problematic for patients beyond the physical ulceration of their feet because they create social and psychological challenges. Therefore, treating a VLU entails not only closing the ulcer with full epithelialization, but also taking the correct measures to prevent its recurrence.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

While opioids are routinely prescribed for painful and chronic wounds, the effects of the medications are not well described in literature. Past studies suggest that stimulation of mu-opiate receptors on keratinocytes may induce transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and cytokeratin 16 (CK16), which are molecules that appear in wound healing environments. However, other studies suggest opioids may impede immune activation and negatively affect healing.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
WoundSource journal club blog

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care literature review club

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Blog Category: