Practice Accelerator

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surgical instruments for debridement

by the WoundSource Editors

One of the greatest challenges when dealing with biofilms in chronic wounds is identifying their existence in the first place. The extracellular polymeric substance or EPS coating on biofilms essentially is an invisible cloak that protects and hides biofilms from both the body's immune system and antimicrobial therapies. This biofilm property keeps the wound from advancing through the phases of wound healing and thus remaining in the inflammatory phase, thereby allowing further proliferation of biofilms.

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biofilm culture under microscope

by the WoundSource Editors

Have you ever had plaque buildup on your teeth, seen a thin clear film on the top of your pet's water bowl, or stepped into a locker room shower where the floor felt slick and slimy? If so, then did you realize these were all forms of biofilm?

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antibiotic resistant biofilm

by the WoundSource Editors

Identifying and managing biofilms have become two of the most important aspects of wound care. Biofilms can have a significant impact on wound healing, by contributing to bacterial infection, inflammation, and delayed wound healing.1 These issues make reducing biofilm presence a critical component of effective wound care.

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necrotic tissue in wound

by the WoundSource Editors

Biofilm is a complex microbial community containing self- and surface-attached microorganisms that are embedded in an extracellular polymeric substance. The extracellular polymeric substance is a primarily polysaccharide protective matrix synthesized and secreted by the microorganisms that attaches the biofilm firmly to a living or non-living surface. This protective covering does not allow the body's immune system to recognize the presence of the microorganism; therefore, the bacteria evade an immune response, avoid detection by standard diagnostic techniques, and avoid destruction by standard treatments.

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pressure injury risk assessment

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries pose a major risk to patients by increasing morbidity and mortality and causing significant discomfort.1 They are also prevalent, particularly in long-term care facilities, where patient populations may be at higher risk of developing pressure injuries as a result of factors of age, immobility, and comorbidities.2 To reduce the incidence of pressure injuries effectively, nurses and other health care professionals should be aware of the risk factors and the means to evaluate patients. This will allow caregivers to take steps to prevent problems before they develop and treat them more effectively if they do.

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repositioning for pressure injury prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are extremely prevalent, particularly in long-term and other care facilities, and primarily affect older adults, those with cognitive impairment, mobility issues or individuals who are bedfast. Understanding the best ways to prevent skin damage before it develops into a significant injury is critical to improving patient outcomes and reducing costs.1 This brief guide will introduce nurses and other health care professionals to pressure injury prevention best practices to reduce the risk of patients’ developing these preventable wounds.

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pressure injury prevention and management

by the WoundSource Editors

Nurses and other health care professionals providing care to patients regularly face challenges that can make it more difficult to perform routine tasks and ensure patient comfort and well-being, especially with regard to pressure ulcer/injury prevention and treatment. From a lack of mobility to chronic diseases, these challenges often coincide and interplay, creating unique risks and complications in managing the care of patients.

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pressure injury treatment

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are among the most costly and prevalent conditions faced by health care professionals. It is estimated that in the United States alone, pressure injuries cost up to $11.6 billion each year with an estimated per-injury cost of $20,900 to $151,700.1 The elderly, individuals with chronic conditions such as diabetes, and those with limited mobility are significantly more likely to develop pressure injuries than other patients. It is extremely important that health care professionals understand best practice treatments to help reduce the severity and longevity of these wounds.