Product Education

WoundSource Editors's picture
foam wound dressing

Wound dressings can accelerate the healing process by protecting the injury or wound from bacteria and creating an environment which supports healthy healing. Foam dressings are an effective tool for moist wound healing and are particularly useful in preventing dressing-related trauma, managing exuding wounds, and minimizing dressing discomfort and pain.

Holly Hovan's picture
comparison

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As wound care clinicians, we are aware that part of the process of consulting requires a comprehensive wound assessment, looking at wound characteristics, causative factors, and drainage. As I've previously mentioned, we've all heard the term, "a dry cell is a dead cell." However, not all wounds are dry.

Janet Wolfson's picture
compression therapy for lymphedema

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

The intersection of wounds and lymphedema has been on my mind this week as challenging patients and a new reduction garment cross my dual specialty life.

Margaret Heale's picture
Medical supply waste

Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

It is truly shocking how much plastic we use and how much medical supply waste there is. From gloves that we wear to touch a patient's skin, to the sterile packed scissors that we are meant to dispose of into the sharps after use.

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Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
wound care product ingredients

by Jeffrey Levine MD

While I’m on rounds with students I like to ask, "What is the active ingredient of hydrogel?" My query is usually met with puzzled looks. It's a trick question, because the term "active ingredient" generally applies to pharmacologic agents that undergo metabolic change in biologic systems. The active ingredient of hydrogel which gives this substance its name is water. Compounds are added to thicken the mixture and provide viscosity, such as glycerine. Other ingredients common in cosmetics, such as aloe vera, methyl paraben, hydrogenated castor oil, and propyl paraben, are added to hydrogel depending on the manufacturer.

Cheryl Carver's picture
advanced bioactive wound technologies

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The growing market for bioactive wound care products has been very interesting and exciting to me. I have been involved the past couple years as an anonymous wound panel expert, council member, and consultant for upcoming bioactive wound care dressing research. We will start seeing an increase in various biomaterials, versus gauze and superabsorbent dressing types used globally. Multifunctional-type dressings will also make waves.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
frequently asked wound care treatment questions

by Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

I travel to several states educating wound care providers and nurses in the long-term care setting. Many of the questions I get are the same whether I'm on the east or west coast. The one question that I encounter the most often during wound rounds or an education session is: "How do I know which treatment to use for this wound?"

My general response to this frequently asked question is: Treat the wound according to the characteristics of the wound bed. This simple answer often leads to more questions. What does that really mean? What wound bed characteristics am I looking for? Which wound treatment will address those characteristics? What treatments can I use together, and are there treatments I should not combine?

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WoundSource Editors's picture
hydrocolloid dressing for wounds - granuflex border dressing

by the WoundSource Editors

Hydrocolloid dressings provide a moist and insulating healing environment which protects uninfected wounds while allowing the body's own enzymes to help heal wounds. These dressings are unique because they don't have to be changed as often as some other wound dressings and are easy to apply.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

Laurie Swezey's picture
aerobic proteus bacteria in a wound

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Activated charcoal has been used in various types of wound care dressings. Although charcoal in itself does not enhance wound healing, it can help to minimize the odors associated with wounds. This is important, as wound odor can be very distressing for the patient, and the patient's family and caregivers.