Product Ingredients

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
wound care product ingredients

by Jeffrey Levine MD

While I’m on rounds with students I like to ask, "What is the active ingredient of hydrogel?" My query is usually met with puzzled looks. It's a trick question, because the term "active ingredient" generally applies to pharmacologic agents that undergo metabolic change in biologic systems. The active ingredient of hydrogel which gives this substance its name is water. Compounds are added to thicken the mixture and provide viscosity, such as glycerine. Other ingredients common in cosmetics, such as aloe vera, methyl paraben, hydrogenated castor oil, and propyl paraben, are added to hydrogel depending on the manufacturer.

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
skin care moisturizers

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

There are currently hundreds of skin moisturizing products on the market for clinicians to choose from. It is often difficult to wade through various brands and formulations to determine which is appropriate to treat a specific issue, and even more is involved in understanding the function of each ingredient. Protecting the body’s functional barrier is integral to staving off pathogens and defending the body from infection.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
honey treatment and wounds

by Aletha Tippett MD

How often have you thought about using honey in a wound dressing? Never? In twenty years of wound care, honey was always something that could be used – sometimes by itself on a wound, or sometimes with other dressing material used on a wound.

Laurie Swezey's picture
aerobic proteus bacteria in a wound

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Activated charcoal has been used in various types of wound care dressings. Although charcoal in itself does not enhance wound healing, it can help to minimize the odors associated with wounds. This is important, as wound odor can be very distressing for the patient, and the patient's family and caregivers.

Michel Hermans's picture
honey bees

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

In the June 2015 issue of the Journal of Ostomy Wound Management, Bell et al. published an article in which they reacted to the recent decision by CMS (January 22, 2015) to change its HCPCS code for a Manuka honey dressing for Medicare Part B patients to a non-covered code. Apparently, this ruling was based on the fact that the dressing is impregnated with more than 50% (by weight) honey. The authors, rightly so, stated that this would be a major loss for a significant number of patients who, under the previous ruling, would have been able to use the dressing as a reimbursed material. Indeed, this specific dressing is one of the materials with a good record with regard to clinical proof.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
stopwatch

by Aletha Tippett MD

Wound cleansing is an interesting dilemma. What? How can that be a dilemma? Everyone knows that you cleanse a wound before dressing it. This is what has been taught for years. Wound cleansing began in the late 19th or early 20th century once the germ theory was proposed and accepted, and hygiene was successful in reducing infections and death, and improving wound outcomes.

Colton Mason's picture

Jolt #3: Healthcare Caffeine, WoundSource Edition
by Colton Mason

Medicare has recently made a significant change to several wound care dressings with honey-based components. The Medicare contractor (PDAC) which assigns reimbursement codes to wound care products made the decision to change HCPCS codes for honey-based dressings containing more than 50% medical honey to A9270. I have been working with a market leading brand in this product category, MediHoney® (Derma Sciences), to ensure everyone has the most up-to-date information regarding this recent Medicare Policy change. Here is the information that the manufacturer has compiled to help healthcare providers make educated decisions for prescribing honey-based dressings in lieu of the recent changes from Medicare:

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Remedy Products by Medline

by Cerise Adams and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Our skin is the largest organ in our body requiring a significant amount of vascular support to stay healthy and protective. As we get older, our circulation slows down just when our skin needs more support and more nutrition to continue to function. Besides regular cleansing and proper moisturizing, our skin needs nutrients to maintain its ideal function. The Medline Remedy skin care line has attempted to provide that with a topical, bioavailable formula that is antinflammatory and easily absorbed by skin cells.

WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Health care professionals have a major responsibility for assuring patient safety and quality of care when making wound care product selections or recommending treatment options. This is particularly true for wound care.

One component in this is understanding the process used by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to classify products. The FDA determines what testing is required for each product category; what claims can be made; the indications and contraindications for each product; and ingredients required for specific claims. Unfortunately, clinical education does not usually include a basic course in the FDA classification system and regulatory requirements.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
gauze

by Keval Parikh and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

There are many different kinds of wound dressings available. Choosing one to use depends on the unique characteristics of the wound. According to Watson and Hodgkin, the ideal wound dressing should exhibit a number of characteristics by providing the following: moisture and exudate management, prevention of saturation and strikethrough, diffusion of wound gases, microorganism protection, mechanical protection; localized temperature and pH control; removal/change comfort; wound odor management; cosmetic acceptability; non-allergenic composition; non-contamination of the wound bed; and cost-effectiveness.1