Skin Conditions

Holly Hovan's picture
elderly patient skin tear prevention

Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

I'm sure you're all familiar with the terms "prednisone skin," "thin skin," "fragile skin," or "easily bruises." One or all of these phrases are commonly used to describe our geriatric population's aging skin. As we age, so does our skin. Skin loses elasticity and often gains wrinkles. Skin conditions that were maybe never present throughout life can crop up with aging. Keep in mind that the environment and different exposures (to sunlight, smoking, and stress) can cause our skin to age differently.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
questions in wound care

On April 26, 2017, I presented a webinar on WoundSource.com on the topic of Moisture-Associated Skin Damage (MASD). Afterwards, there was a Q&A session with the participants of the webinar. This is a selection of some of those questions and their answers.

Martin Vera's picture
anatomy of the skin, the body's largest organ

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

On our last encounter we discussed wound bed preparation and the TIME framework. What I wish to accomplish with this post is to make it easier to understand the skin, the changes it undergoes as we age, and pave the way for the phases of wound healing—all of which are essential in becoming a better clinician.

Cheryl Carver's picture
fungi candida albicans 3D

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

It doesn't matter where exactly I am educating, I see it everywhere: the vicious cycle of chronic intertrigo and or candida infections (candidiasis) of the skin in the long-term care arena. Skin and soft tissue infections are the third most common infection in long-term care.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
skin care moisturizers

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

There are currently hundreds of skin moisturizing products on the market for clinicians to choose from. It is often difficult to wade through various brands and formulations to determine which is appropriate to treat a specific issue, and even more is involved in understanding the function of each ingredient. Protecting the body’s functional barrier is integral to staving off pathogens and defending the body from infection.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
dry skin and pressure ulcers

by Aletha Tippett MD

The other day I received a phone call from a dear physician friend of mine who works tirelessly in the field of pressure support and pressure ulcer prevention. He had been talking to some older nurses who told him that "in their day" they kept their patients lubed up and never had a skin problem.

Cheryl Carver's picture

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Being an independent wound care education consultant in long-term care, I get a lot of questions regarding moisture-associated skin damage (MASD). Is it MASD or a pressure ulcer? When do I change it from MASD to pressure ulcer in my documentation?

Laurie Swezey's picture
maceration of periwound skin

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

A wound that is too moist can be as detrimental to wound healing as a wound that is too dry. When a wound is too moist, the skin surrounding the wound, known as the periwound, can become macerated. Skin that is macerated is vulnerable to breakdown, leading to a possible increase in wound size.

What can be done to protect the vulnerable periwound? There are several prevention strategies that can be used to prevent maceration and further skin breakdown.

Laurie Swezey's picture
Skin moisture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Patients with bariatric needs present a special challenge in terms of skin care and prevention of pressure ulcers. Once damage to the skin occurs, bariatric patients heal more slowly due to decreased vascularity of the skin and reduced perfusion of adipose tissue. Bariatric patients are at high risk for acute wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, non-healing surgical wounds and diabetic wounds of the foot.

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Rick Hall's picture
elderly hands

by Rick Hall, BA, RN, CWON

Series Note: Dying patients experience a variety of skin changes, including pressure ulcers, as part of the natural dying process. While this phenomenon has been recognized in the health care literature for centuries, the explanations and etiologies have yet to be fully elucidated. In this blog series, I will be discussing key concepts related to Skin Changes At Life's End and the Kennedy Terminal Ulcer from the perspective of a hospice wound care nurse. Suggestions for clinical practice and a case series with discussion will also be presented in future posts.