Wound Assessment

Janet Wolfson's picture
delayed wound healing

by Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Delayed wound healing: how did it start, what are we doing to prevent delay, and what could we be doing differently when delay is noted?

If you have worked in wound care a long time, there are those wounds we recall that were a real puzzle. Why wouldn't they heal when we were doing everything right? Sometimes it is as simple as finding out that the client has been sleeping in a recliner instead of a bed, in which case edema and sacral wounds will suffer. Or perhaps that the patient has resumed smoking now that their mobility allowed getting outdoors.

Martin Vera's picture
barriers to wound healing

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

It is critical to understand the phases of wound healing, layers of the skin, and how wounds heal, as well as the different types of tissues present on wounds. We learn to understand the importance of the SWAT team (skin, wound, assessment team) and that this is not a one man or woman job. There is no single "super wound clinician" that can do all this by themselves – without a great team behind them or the support of MDs, DPMs, therapists, the patient, CNAs, family members, environmental team, and basically anyone who comes in contact with the patient.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
arterial and vascular disease

by Aletha Tippett MD

This week I saw a patient with terminal peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Seeing him reminded me of how often the severity of this disease is misunderstood. He had had amputation of the toes on his right foot due to gangrene

Terri Kolenich's picture
long-term care facility pressure injury staging at admission

by Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

Question: What are Quality Measures, how does my long-term care facility measure up, and how can we improve?

Answer: Proper pressure injury staging on admission, that's how!

WoundSource Editors's picture
signs of wound infection

by the WoundSource Editors

A break in the skin through injury or surgery allows bacteria to enter the body and begin to multiply. Recognizing the first signs of wound infection enables health care professionals to swiftly intervene with treatment. Here are some of the primary signs of wound infection:

Martin Vera's picture
wound healing and wound bed preparation

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Wound bed preparation has become the gold standard model for proper wound assessment. It allows us clinicians to identify and breakdown local barriers to wound healing. Throughout our health care careers, we have seen it over and over again: the collective emphasize on standards of care, evidence-based practice, and cost-effectiveness in order to achieve positive outcomes for our patients.The wound bed preparation model supports all of these aspects of care delivery.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Stage 1 Pressure Injury - Darkly Pigmented Skin

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I have worked all over the country as an educator. The same gaps in education arise everywhere. A few years ago, I began teaching skin color awareness as part of my course curriculum. I feel strongly about it being a part of my inservices and course education. Understanding skin color as it relates to assessment is critical in the prevention of pressure injuries.

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Lindsay Andronaco's picture
surgical wound bandage and drainage

by Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Wound exudate and how to properly assess and manage it has been a long standing clinical challenge in wound care. Assessing the exudate color, odor, volume, viscosity, and if it is causing maceration of the periwound skin are all important to note when creating a care plan for the patient. If there is not proper management of the exudate, then the high protease levels and low growth factor levels will negatively impact wound healing time.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
WoundSource journal club blog

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
health care quality measures

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014 (IMPACT) amends Title XVIII of the Social Security Act by adding a new section – Standardized Post-Acute Care (PAC) Assessment Data for Quality, Payment, and Discharge Planning. The goal of the IMPACT Act is to reform PAC payments and reimbursement while ensuring continued beneficiary access to the most appropriate setting of care. The act requires the submission of standardized and interoperable PAC assessment and quality measurement data by Long-Term Care Hospitals (LTCH), Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF), Home Health Agencies (HHA) and Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities (IRF).