Wound Treatments

WoundSource Editors's picture
post-operative wound drainage

As health care professionals monitor the wound drainage of a patient, it is critical to be able to recognize the different types of wound drainage. Open wounds and incision wounds may both present varying types of exudate, some of which are perfectly healthy and others which can signal an infection or slow healing. Identifying wounds that need a change in care can speed the healing process. Here are the four main types of wound drainage health care professionals need to know.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
pressure injury treatment

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are among the most costly and prevalent conditions faced by health care professionals. It is estimated that in the United States alone, pressure injuries cost up to $11.6 billion each year with an estimated per-injury cost of $20,900 to $151,700.1 The elderly, individuals with chronic conditions such as diabetes, and those with limited mobility are significantly more likely to develop pressure injuries than other patients. It is extremely important that health care professionals understand best practice treatments to help reduce the severity and longevity of these wounds.

WoundSource Editors's picture
venous system

A venous ulcer, also known as a stasis ulcer or venous leg ulcer, is a shallow wound that usually occurs on the sides of the lower leg, between the calf and ankle. Since venous ulcers often are slow in healing and frequently recur if not properly treated, it is important for health care providers to understand their diagnosis and treatment.

Margaret Heale's picture
Keywords: 
compression wrapping

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wrapping wounds is an art, and hence, it comes easily to some and more difficult to others. This post won't make you a wound dressing artist, but it does provide some tips for good bandaging techniques. The word "bandage" (in the US) often refers to a primary dressing, so "wrap" better describes a bandage that is long, narrow, and may be used to secure a primary dressing or obtain graduated compression on a limb.

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture

by Jeffrey Levine MD

Pressure injury prevention and management are sometimes overlooked in the hospital setting, where the focus is generally on acute illness. Given the immense implications in terms of cost, complications, reputation, and risk management, it is in the interest of all facilities to maximize quality of care with regard to wounds. This post will offer some suggestions on how this can be accomplished in hospitals by tweaking the system for maximum quality.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

Wounds with exposed bone and tendon are a major concern for physicians due to the significant morbidity that they can cause. The primary focus of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of a biologically active, cryopreserved human skin allograft for the treatment of wounds of this nature.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Chronic wounds and ulcerations induced by complications associated with diabetes mellitus have proven to be a burden to the patients themselves, as well as the healthcare system as a whole. This burden has required physicians to not only find interventions that work better, but are also more cost effective. In the population with diabetes, 1 out of 4 will have an ulceration of the lower extremity at some point in their life. It’s also important to state that these foot ulcers can lead to some form of amputation in 20% of these patients. Standard wound care typically involves moist dressings, debridement, wound offloading, infection control, and in some cases, advanced therapies. The authors of this study looked into two of these advanced therapies, bioengineered skin substitutes (BSS) and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membranes (dHACM.) The primary objective of the study was to see which worked best, as compared to standard wound care (SWC), while the secondary objective was to see which had the lowest costs.

Margaret Heale's picture
dressing removal

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wounds are dressed every day, and much goes into the choices that are made to properly apply wound dressings. The condition of the periwound skin should be a major factor in the decisions made, as injuring this area can extend the wound and cause considerable pain. Tape removal is one of the most painful areas of wound care.

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Ron Sherman's picture
road blocks to maggot debridement therapy

by Ronald Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

Bob Hope and Bing Crosby starred in a series of films called "On the Road" in which the duo traveled around the globe, facing a variety of amusing obstacles and mishaps. Therapists and patients desiring maggot debridement therapy (MDT) for their non-healing wounds often face a variety of obstacles, too... though they may not seem quite as amusing. Let's consider some of these obstacles and examine ways to avoid or mitigate them.

We can organize the most likely obstacles chronologically:

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Janet Wolfson's picture
kidney failure-related edema

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Acute care wound or edema professionals are bombarded with multiple kinds of edema that can be treated in many ways—and with many choices of compression garments. What to choose?