Wound Treatments

Ron Sherman's picture
road blocks to maggot debridement therapy

by Ronald Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

Bob Hope and Bing Crosby starred in a series of films called "On the Road" in which the duo traveled around the globe, facing a variety of amusing obstacles and mishaps. Therapists and patients desiring maggot debridement therapy (MDT) for their non-healing wounds often face a variety of obstacles, too... though they may not seem quite as amusing. Let's consider some of these obstacles and examine ways to avoid or mitigate them.

We can organize the most likely obstacles chronologically:

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Janet Wolfson's picture
kidney failure-related edema

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Acute care wound or edema professionals are bombarded with multiple kinds of edema that can be treated in many ways—and with many choices of compression garments. What to choose?

Hy-Tape International's picture
Keywords: 
dressing wound - medical adhesive

by Hy-Tape International

Nurses and other health care professionals often dress dozens of wounds in a single day. Each wound must be appropriately cared for using best practices in order to reduce the risk of infection, discomfort, and other complications. Yet many health care professionals struggle to dress wounds in difficult places, and struggle to ensure the dressing stays secure even when the patient is active. In order to more effectively dress wounds, it is important to adopt best practices for wound care and use better wound dressings and adhesives.

Cheryl Carver's picture
fat grafting for pressure injuries

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

This month's blog topic idea came about from a recent conversation with a middle-aged patient with paraplegia. She had a stage 4 pressure injury due to being in her wheelchair long hours, along with a low BMI. I made the comment, "I wish I could give you a fat transplant." She laughed. She then asked, "Well, why not?" Later that day the topic of fat grafting popped up on social media in a spinal cord injury group I follow. I ended up chatting with a few spinal cord injury folks that were serious about coming up with funds to get fat grafting done. They all had a fear of, or a previous history of pressure injuries. These folks with past pressure injuries had used advanced wound care dressings, support surfaces, high-end cushions, supplements, negative pressure wound therapy, a slew of antibiotics, and even flap closures.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Zinc in wound healing

by Aletha Tippett MD

Well, what a surprise to find that what you have been doing all along is really the right thing to do even though you didn’t know the reason. Always, over the years doing wound care, I applied a thick layer of zinc oxide ointment around the patient’s wound, then put my dressing on the wound and covered it with a topping, usually plastic wrap pressed into the zinc oxide ointment.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
delayed wound healing

by Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Delayed wound healing: how did it start, what are we doing to prevent delay, and what could we be doing differently when delay is noted?

If you have worked in wound care a long time, there are those wounds we recall that were a real puzzle. Why wouldn't they heal when we were doing everything right? Sometimes it is as simple as finding out that the client has been sleeping in a recliner instead of a bed, in which case edema and sacral wounds will suffer. Or perhaps that the patient has resumed smoking now that their mobility allowed getting outdoors.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Leech Therapy

by Aletha Tippett MD

People from across the country call or email me asking about using leeches for a loved one. Usually, I tell them to try to find someone close to them to administer therapy. Often, the problem is not something a leech could help. I have written about leech therapy before, but maybe it’s time to review how leeches can be used in wound management.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
technology-in-wound-care

by Aletha Tippett MD

In looking at technology that helps in wound care, how many know about—and use—lasers? Cold lasers have been used by physical therapists for years, but cosmetic lasers can also be used. I have had tremendous success using laser therapy on wounds. Healing is much improved (and faster), with less scarring. I am not a technocrat. I’m much more old-fashioned, but the laser is a wonder.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
Neck Surgery

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Recovery and treatment of the head and neck cancer or head trauma patient goes beyond the surgery. Modifications in diet, adapted ADL, instruction in self-MLD, and taking precautions to heart are essential components of recovery. Some patients may need compression garments to deal with the lymphedema.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
arterial and vascular disease

by Aletha Tippett MD

This week I saw a patient with terminal peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Seeing him reminded me of how often the severity of this disease is misunderstood. He had had amputation of the toes on his right foot due to gangrene