Wound Types

Janet Wolfson's picture
lymphedema and the lymphatic system

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

If you had a chance to read last month's blog on the lymphedema and the lymphatic system, you're probably still amazed that such a wonderful system that provides immunity and handles fluid in our bodies exists in such secrecy. This blog discusses what can go wrong with the lymphatic system. Because this network has many parts throughout the body, with cells that generated and living in different areas, whose complexity needs consideration with other disease processes or surgery, and must be constructed in 9 months of gestation... A lot could go wrong!

Blog Category: 
Cheryl Carver's picture
Stop Pressure Injuries - Pressure Injury Prevention

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I consider myself to be beyond blessed. I know that my purpose in life is to be useful, compassionate, and to make a difference in wound care… In any capacity I can. I have no problem sharing my mother's story with my patients. I think it shows that I am genuine and compassionate. I do whatever works to help my patients understand the importance of pressure injury prevention and/or treatment. My point is: do whatever works. It is good to think outside of the box!

Blog Category: 
Janet Wolfson's picture
the lymphatic system

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

When I talk to my patients with lymphedema, I often need to tell them about their lymphatic system. Beyond knowing of lymph nodes or glands in their neck, most don't recall having heard anything about it. Surprisingly, today's medical students often have less than one hour on the lymphatic system education in medical school.

Blog Category: 
Martin Vera's picture
diabetic foot ulcer

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

In this last of our three-part series on lower extremity wounds, we will focus our attention to diabetic foot/neuropathic ulcers. Research indicates that the United States national average for diabetes mellitus (DM) accounts for a little over 8% of the nation, or roughly over 18 million Americans afflicted with this disease—what the industry refers to "the silent killer" for the amount of damage it causes. DM has the capacity to affect vision and circulation, as well as increase the incidence of stroke and renal disease, just to name a few associated problems. Over 20% of individuals with diabetes will develop ulcerations, with a recurrence rate of over 50% for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) alone. Overall, lower extremity wounds have recurrence rate of 40-90%. We have our work cut out for us. So, let's put our deuces up, recognize early intervention, and try our best to manage and prevent complications associated with DM.

Blog Category: 
Holly Hovan's picture
elderly patient skin tear prevention

Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

I'm sure you're all familiar with the terms "prednisone skin," "thin skin," "fragile skin," or "easily bruises." One or all of these phrases are commonly used to describe our geriatric population's aging skin. As we age, so does our skin. Skin loses elasticity and often gains wrinkles. Skin conditions that were maybe never present throughout life can crop up with aging. Keep in mind that the environment and different exposures (to sunlight, smoking, and stress) can cause our skin to age differently.

Blog Category: 
Martin Vera's picture
Arterial Wounds

by Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

As we move forward in our continuation of lower extremity wounds, we will now turn our attention to arterial wounds. In my previous post, we discussed challenges with venous leg ulcers. Lower extremity wounds continue to challenge clinicians on a daily basis. We often refer to them as "the big three" – or how I like to refer to them, "the pesky triplets." It doesn't matter what we call them, we know we are referring to venous leg ulcers, arterial ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. In no way shape or manner will we disregard the many other types of lower extremity wounds we may encounter as wound clinicians, but these three are the most common and often present with treatment challenges.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture
arterial and vascular disease

by Aletha Tippett MD

This week I saw a patient with terminal peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Seeing him reminded me of how often the severity of this disease is misunderstood. He had had amputation of the toes on his right foot due to gangrene

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections, accounting for 20% of total documented infections each year and costing approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, patient morbidity and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs.

Blog Category: 
Cheryl Carver's picture
Managing shear and pressure in preventing pressure injuries

by Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Let us start off this post with a typical scenario. You walk into any facility or institution and you see a patient slouched in their wheelchair, with no wheelchair cushion. You notice part of their brief hanging out of the top of their pants, so you assume the patient may be incontinent. So let’s think about this for a minute. We most likely have friction, shear, and moisture going on with this patient

Blog Category: 
Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has designated November 17, 2016 as World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day and is urging states to join the effort and raise awareness about the need to prevent pressure injuries. As of October 1st, North Carolina, New Jersey, Nevada, and the District of Columbia have issued State Proclamations for Pressure Injury Prevention Awareness Day.