Wound Types

Martin Vera's picture
Arterial Wounds

by Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

As we move forward in our continuation of lower extremity wounds, we will now turn our attention to arterial wounds. In my previous post, we discussed challenges with venous leg ulcers. Lower extremity wounds continue to challenge clinicians on a daily basis. We often refer to them as "the big three" – or how I like to refer to them, "the pesky triplets." It doesn't matter what we call them, we know we are referring to venous leg ulcers, arterial ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. In no way shape or manner will we disregard the many other types of lower extremity wounds we may encounter as wound clinicians, but these three are the most common and often present with treatment challenges.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
arterial and vascular disease

by Aletha Tippett MD

This week I saw a patient with terminal peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Seeing him reminded me of how often the severity of this disease is misunderstood. He had had amputation of the toes on his right foot due to gangrene

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections, accounting for 20% of total documented infections each year and costing approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, patient morbidity and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
Managing shear and pressure in preventing pressure injuries

by Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Let us start off this post with a typical scenario. You walk into any facility or institution and you see a patient slouched in their wheelchair, with no wheelchair cushion. You notice part of their brief hanging out of the top of their pants, so you assume the patient may be incontinent. So let’s think about this for a minute. We most likely have friction, shear, and moisture going on with this patient

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has designated November 17, 2016 as World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day and is urging states to join the effort and raise awareness about the need to prevent pressure injuries. As of October 1st, North Carolina, New Jersey, Nevada, and the District of Columbia have issued State Proclamations for Pressure Injury Prevention Awareness Day.

Terri Kolenich's picture
long-term care facility pressure injury staging at admission

by Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

Question: What are Quality Measures, how does my long-term care facility measure up, and how can we improve?

Answer: Proper pressure injury staging on admission, that's how!

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
documentation of pressure injury never event

by Jeffrey M. Levine MD, AGSF, CWS-P

The term "never event" is commonly applied to pressure injuries, perpetuating the impression that they are always associated with medical error. The reality is that the preventability of all pressure related wounds has never been proven, and most authorities agree they can occur even in the best of circumstances. As such, the term "never event" lends this outcome an emotional charge that can lead to misplaced patient dissatisfaction and unnecessary accusations of wrongdoing or poor quality care.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
factors affecting healing in chronic wounds

by the WoundSource Editors

Whether due to injury or surgery, wound healing normally progresses steadily through an orderly set of stages. Wounds that don't heal within 30 days are considered chronic. Wounds that become chronic generally stall in one or more of the phases of wound healing.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
support surface technology and pressure injury prevention

by Aletha Tippett MD

The idea that pressure injuries (ulcers) can be prevented through equipment or device technology is one we must challenge as clinicians. A manufacturer of support surfaces, for example, may try to tell us that their beds, technologically superior, will prevent pressure injuries from forming.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
total knee replacement surgical wound healing

by Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

If you read my last blog on therapeutic interventions to stimulate wound healing, then you may recall the asset that a lymphedema trained therapist can be to your wound care department. A recent patient at the inpatient rehab facility where I am currently the Wound Care Coordinator illustrates this wonderfully.