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signs of wound infection

by the WoundSource Editors

A break in the skin through injury or surgery allows bacteria to enter the body and begin to multiply. Recognizing the first signs of wound infection enables health care professionals to swiftly intervene with treatment. Here are some of the primary signs of wound infection:

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factors affecting healing in chronic wounds

by the WoundSource Editors

Whether due to injury or surgery, wound healing normally progresses steadily through an orderly set of stages. Wounds that don't heal within 30 days are considered chronic. Wounds that become chronic generally stall in one or more of the phases of wound healing.

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the four phases of wound healing

by the WoundSource Editors

The stages of wound healing proceed in an organized way and follow four processes: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Although the stages of wound healing are linear, wounds can progress backward or forward depending on internal and external patient conditions. The four stages of wound healing are:

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the final stage of wound healing

by the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the practice of keeping a wound in an optimally moist environment in order to promote faster healing. Research has shown that moist wound healing is three to five times quicker than the healing of wounds that are allowed to dry out.

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truth

by Carrie Maldonado
Any time we are in an unpleasant-feeling situation, we have two choices in how to respond: there is rationalization and there is truth.

Rationalization is a process of telling yourself a story about something to make yourself feel better about that situation. The purpose of rationalization is to keep yourself from taking the scary step towards change. Truth, on the other hand, leads to freedom, hope and change. How so, you ask?

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A decubitus ulcers are an open skin wound sometimes known as a pressure ulcer, bed sore, or pressure sore. A decubitus ulcer forms where the weight of a person's body presses their skin against a firm surface, such as a bed or wheelchair. Pressure cuts off the blood supply to the skin and injuries skin cells. Initially, the skin usually looks red or a bit discolored. Eventually, if the pressure isn't relieved, the skin breaks down and the tissue dies (necrosis). With proper diagnostic care and treatment, most people with a decubitus ulcer have a good prognosis for recovery.

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occlusive dressing

Occlusive dressings are used for sealing particular types of wounds and their surrounding tissue off from air, fluids and harmful contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, in a trauma or first aid situation. They are often utilized as an immediate means of controlling the cleanliness of a wound as well as the loss of blood until surgery can be used for long-term treatment.

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wound dihescence on abdomen

Wound dehiscence is a distressing but common occurrence among patients who have received sutures. The condition involves the wound opening up either partially or completely along the sutures – basically, the wound reopens to create a new wound.

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health care professional resume

by Dr. Heather Rothbauer-Wanish

Are you considering a geographical move that requires you to search for work? Do you think you're ready for that internal promotion in your facility? Or, have you been thinking about 'what's out there' in terms of new opportunities in the health care field? If you answer 'yes' to any of these things questions, you will definitely need a new or updated resume to move forward.

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hydrocolloid dressing for wounds - granuflex border dressing

by the WoundSource Editors

Hydrocolloid dressings provide a moist and insulating healing environment which protects uninfected wounds while allowing the body's own enzymes to help heal wounds. These dressings are unique because they don't have to be changed as often as some other wound dressings and are easy to apply.

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