Diabetes

Janet Wolfson's picture
patient interview questions

by Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

I was recently listening to one of my favorite news sources, NPR, enjoying an interview with James E. Ryan, the author of "Wait, What? - and Life's Other Essential Questions". The premise was that asking the right questions can lead to a happier and more successful life. A physician called in to relate that this was something he had been doing in his medical practice. I couldn't have agreed more – the questions I ask my patients (and then listening to their answers) can go a long way toward making an intervention in their health care more successful.

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Michel Hermans's picture
Year in review

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

At the beginning of a new year, many look back at the previous one in an attempt to analyze what happened, whether it was good or bad or perhaps even special.

From a chronic or acute wound healing point of view, 2015 was not particularly special. Yes, a number of new dressings and techniques were launched at the different conferences, but none of them really established a breakthrough with regard to new clinical data or a totally new approach to many of the still unsolved problems that exist in healing wounds.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

by Tedman L. Tan and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

The management of diabetic foot ulcers is becoming an increasingly significant concern with the growing population of patients with diabetes in the United States. Most amputations involving the lower extremity in patients with diabetes are preceded by foot ulcers, and in turn, lower extremity amputations are associated with a high 5-year mortality rate at around 45% among individuals with diabetes.1 Therefore, diabetic foot ulcers require special attention due to the possible life-threatening complications associated with such wounds.

WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

The term diabetic foot refers generally to the increased occurrence of complications in the feet of patients with diabetes mellitus. The most common foot problems related to diabetes are peripheral neuropathy leading to ulceration, vascular disease, increased risk of infection, and deformities like Charcot arthropathy. Complications arising from diabetes are the most common non-traumatic injury to cause lower extremity amputation.

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Mark Hinkes's picture

by Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

On June 27, 1991, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and World Health Organization (WHO) proclaimed the first World Diabetes Day. Today, World Diabetes Day is celebrated worldwide as an acknowledgement of the condition, symptoms, complications, treatment and resolve to find a cure for the disease. Participants in the celebration include 230 member associations of the International Diabetes Federation in more than 160 countries and territories. All Member States of the United Nations as well as other associations and organizations, companies, health care professionals and people living with diabetes and their families also observe World Diabetes Day. World Diabetes day will be celebrated on Friday, November 14th this year.

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Lindsay Andronaco's picture

by Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Many people do not realize that the two most common issues we see in hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy patients are ear/barotraumas and a decrease in their blood glucose level. In general, HBO is very well tolerated and requires little other than a commitment to the treatment series.

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Bruce Ruben's picture
patient comorbidities in health history

by Bruce E. Ruben MD

In order to heal a wound, the body needs oxygen, nutrients, energy and a fully functioning vascular system that brings those resources to the wound and takes waste products away from the wound.

So it follows that any medical condition that diverts those resources from a wound could be considered a comorbidity or cofactor that inhibits wound healing.

There are hundreds of specific medical conditions that can inhibit or even prevent wounds from healing. Below are some of the more general and easily identifiable conditions.

David Hite's picture

by David Hite PhD

Diabetes, the leading cause of amputation of the lower limbs, places an enormous burden on both the individual and the health care system. It’s estimated that the annual cost for treating diabetic foot problems is over one billion dollars. During their lifetime, 15 percent of people with diabetes will experience a foot ulcer and about 20 percent of those will require amputation.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett, MD

In my work as a wound physician, most of the patients I treat have diabetes because of this, much of my time is spent working with these patients to manage their diabetes.

The problems that results from their condition include: diabetic neuropathy that is often severe enough to cause limb loss, wounds, obesity, renal failure, vision loss, plus the expense of medications and the intrusion on their lives to manage diet and lifestyle.

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