Dressings

WoundSource Editors's picture
healing with alginate dressing

What is an Alginate Dressing?

Biodegradable alginate dressings made from seaweed date back at least fifty years and commercially available alginate has been available since 1983. Often used on wounds with heavy exudate, the alginates used to produce these dressings are made from a variety of seaweeds harvested around the world. Arguably underused, these dressings are not well studied and documented in the medical literature compared to other modern dressings.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Wounds tend to follow a certain algorithm when healing, which can be summed down to three distinct phases: hemostasic/inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling. Chronic wounds are characterized as wounds that do not follow this pattern and fail to heal within 8 weeks. They tend to occur in patients that have uncontrolled comorbidities causing the healing cycle to get "stuck" in the inflammatory phase. There are roughly 6.5 million cases of chronic wounds noted annually in the United States. Thus, the need for better products that may induce quicker healing are highly sought after.

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Hy-Tape International's picture
dressing wound - medical adhesive

by Hy-Tape International

Nurses and other health care professionals often dress dozens of wounds in a single day. Each wound must be appropriately cared for using best practices in order to reduce the risk of infection, discomfort, and other complications. Yet many health care professionals struggle to dress wounds in difficult places, and struggle to ensure the dressing stays secure even when the patient is active. In order to more effectively dress wounds, it is important to adopt best practices for wound care and use better wound dressings and adhesives.

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Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
wound care product ingredients

by Jeffrey Levine MD

While I’m on rounds with students I like to ask, "What is the active ingredient of hydrogel?" My query is usually met with puzzled looks. It's a trick question, because the term "active ingredient" generally applies to pharmacologic agents that undergo metabolic change in biologic systems. The active ingredient of hydrogel which gives this substance its name is water. Compounds are added to thicken the mixture and provide viscosity, such as glycerine. Other ingredients common in cosmetics, such as aloe vera, methyl paraben, hydrogenated castor oil, and propyl paraben, are added to hydrogel depending on the manufacturer.

Industry News's picture

Mequon, WI – April 5, 2017 – MPP Group recently announced the launch of three new advanced wound care dressings available in bottles and single serve stick-packs.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Industry News's picture

by The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders

The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders played a key role in educating the FDA and its advisory panel on the role and real-world value of antimicrobial wound care dressings, as the FDA considered a regulatory classification of these products that could impact access and availability to wound care providers and patients.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
chicken egg use in wound healing

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
making wound product selection decisions

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Whether you are a provider or a clinician, the challenge of wound dressing selection is ongoing. I have been an educator for quite some time now, and have found that the easiest way to teach dressing selection is by dressing category and wound depth.

WoundSource Editors's picture
the final stage of wound healing

by the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the practice of keeping a wound in an optimally moist environment in order to promote faster healing. Research has shown that moist wound healing is three to five times quicker than the healing of wounds that are allowed to dry out.