Edema

Janet Wolfson's picture
kidney failure-related edema

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Acute care wound or edema professionals are bombarded with multiple kinds of edema that can be treated in many ways—and with many choices of compression garments. What to choose?

WoundSource Editors's picture
factors affecting healing in chronic wounds

by the WoundSource Editors

Whether due to injury or surgery, wound healing normally progresses steadily through an orderly set of stages. Wounds that don't heal within 30 days are considered chronic. Wounds that become chronic generally stall in one or more of the phases of wound healing.

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Bruce Ruben's picture
hand wound

by Bruce E. Ruben MD

A non-healing wound is generally defined as a wound that will not heal within four weeks. If a wound does not heal within this usual time period, the cause is usually found in underlying conditions that have either gone unnoticed or untreated. In general, there are five reasons why wounds will not heal and more than one of these conditions can be operating at the same time.

Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Lymphedema can be defined as swelling of one or more limbs which may also include a portion of the corresponding trunk. Lymphedema can also affect the breast, head, neck or genitalia. It occurs when fluid and other components such as protein accumulate in the tissue spaces as a result of a disparity between the creation of interstitial fluid and its transport or movement. It may be caused by damage to the lymphatic system (i.e., as a result of cancer treatment) or as the result of a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. It is a chronic condition with no cure, but it can be managed if diagnosed early on.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Arterial ulcers can cause much pain for patients and consternation for the wound care professionals tasked with managing them. Arterial ulcers can be a catch-22 in that many patients with arterial ulcers present with edema, but due to the nature of their problem cannot be safely compressed.

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Michael Miller's picture

by Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 2

I recently recognized a puzzling aspect of my wound care practice; I am just not seeing that many infected wounds. Moreover, I seem to use much fewer antibiotics and antimicrobial agents than almost everybody else I know practicing in wound care.

I have come to the conclusion that there must be a dearth of bacteria in my clinics, nursing homes, and at the house calls I make. At the risk of sounding delusional and daft, allow me to rephrase: I know that there are bacteria everywhere, and on everything, and in fact, I overheard a statement that may truly capture the spirit, “the Earth is covered with poo, it’s just thicker in some places than others.”

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Keywords: 

by the WoundSource Editors

Lymphedema (alternate spelling: lymphoedema) is a condition marked by the retention of interstitial fluid (lymph) and the swelling (edema) of surrounding soft tissue, often affecting the extremities. It is also referred to as lymphatic obstruction.

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