Moist Wound Healing

WoundSource Editors's picture
the final stage of wound healing

by the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the practice of keeping a wound in an optimally moist environment in order to promote faster healing. Research has shown that moist wound healing is three to five times quicker than the healing of wounds that are allowed to dry out.

Cheryl Carver's picture
wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
gauze

by Keval Parikh and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

There are many different kinds of wound dressings available. Choosing one to use depends on the unique characteristics of the wound. According to Watson and Hodgkin, the ideal wound dressing should exhibit a number of characteristics by providing the following: moisture and exudate management, prevention of saturation and strikethrough, diffusion of wound gases, microorganism protection, mechanical protection; localized temperature and pH control; removal/change comfort; wound odor management; cosmetic acceptability; non-allergenic composition; non-contamination of the wound bed; and cost-effectiveness.1

Bruce Ruben's picture
Scab

by Bruce E. Ruben MD

In the beginning, long before Johnson met Johnson and Band-Aids were invented, primitive men and women suffered minor cuts and abrasions and probably left them uncovered to heal. After all, the bleeding had stopped, a scab eventually formed and experience had taught them that their skin would heal in a week or two. So there was no great rush to find a use for those puffy, cottony, soft, white plants growing in the fields just yet.

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