Pressure Injuries

Cheryl Carver's picture
pressure-injuries

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Incorrect staging of pressure injuries can cause many types of repercussions. Incorrect documentation can also be worse than no documentation. Pressure injuries and staging mistakes are avoidable, so educating clinicians how to stage with confidence is the goal.

Cheryl Carver's picture
fat grafting for pressure injuries

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

This month's blog topic idea came about from a recent conversation with a middle-aged patient with paraplegia. She had a stage 4 pressure injury due to being in her wheelchair long hours, along with a low BMI. I made the comment, "I wish I could give you a fat transplant." She laughed. She then asked, "Well, why not?" Later that day the topic of fat grafting popped up on social media in a spinal cord injury group I follow. I ended up chatting with a few spinal cord injury folks that were serious about coming up with funds to get fat grafting done. They all had a fear of, or a previous history of pressure injuries. These folks with past pressure injuries had used advanced wound care dressings, support surfaces, high-end cushions, supplements, negative pressure wound therapy, a slew of antibiotics, and even flap closures.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
questions in wound care

On April 26, 2017, I presented a webinar on WoundSource.com on the topic of Moisture-Associated Skin Damage (MASD). Afterwards, there was a Q&A session with the participants of the webinar. This is a selection of some of those questions and their answers.

Janet Wolfson's picture
preventing-pressure-injuries

by Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

As I read through wound care articles on pressure injuries and treatments, I keep going back to one thought: why are they still occurring? They are preventable! Staff are educated, have certifications and equipment, and have been oriented on policy to prevent pressure injuries. I think it comes down to opportunities and choices. A culture of care—bottom to top and back down again—can drastically reduce incidence.

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Margaret Heale's picture
patient repositioning for pressure injury prevention

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

This past fall, I attended the New England WOCN Society regional conference. While I am still processing all the great information that I absorbed there, I'd like to share with you some of the important discussions that came up on the topics of pressure injury staging and patient compliance with repositioning protocols.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Managing shear and pressure in preventing pressure injuries

by Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Let us start off this post with a typical scenario. You walk into any facility or institution and you see a patient slouched in their wheelchair, with no wheelchair cushion. You notice part of their brief hanging out of the top of their pants, so you assume the patient may be incontinent. So let’s think about this for a minute. We most likely have friction, shear, and moisture going on with this patient

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Margaret Heale's picture
wound care terminology

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

I have a few things to draw to your attention from this year's New England WOCN Society regional conference where several impressive items were discussed relating to the topic of pressure injuries. In listening to Dr. Joyce Black give a little background on the NPUAP rationale for the recent changes made to pressure injury staging, it was clear that much thought had gone into changing the term "pressure ulcer" to "pressure injury".

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has designated November 17, 2016 as World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day and is urging states to join the effort and raise awareness about the need to prevent pressure injuries. As of October 1st, North Carolina, New Jersey, Nevada, and the District of Columbia have issued State Proclamations for Pressure Injury Prevention Awareness Day.

Terri Kolenich's picture
long-term care facility pressure injury staging at admission

by Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

Question: What are Quality Measures, how does my long-term care facility measure up, and how can we improve?

Answer: Proper pressure injury staging on admission, that's how!

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
documentation of pressure injury never event

by Jeffrey M. Levine MD, AGSF, CWS-P

The term "never event" is commonly applied to pressure injuries, perpetuating the impression that they are always associated with medical error. The reality is that the preventability of all pressure related wounds has never been proven, and most authorities agree they can occur even in the best of circumstances. As such, the term "never event" lends this outcome an emotional charge that can lead to misplaced patient dissatisfaction and unnecessary accusations of wrongdoing or poor quality care.

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