Pressure Injuries

Diane Krasner's picture
wound care documentation

By Diane L. Krasner, PhD, RN, FAAN

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

Holly Hovan's picture
patient repositioning

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Friction and shear… what’s the difference and how do they cause pressure injuries? Are wounds caused by friction and shear classified as pressure injuries? What’s the easiest way to explain the differences between these critical components of the Braden Scale that are not always understood? How do I know if my patient is at risk?

Blog Category: 
Nancy Munoz's picture
malnutrition and pressure injuries

by Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

Nutrition is a major determinant of health status. Food, as a vital source of nutrition, not only is essential to physiological well-being, but also impacts one's quality of life culturally, socially and psychologically.

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture

by Jeffrey Levine MD

Please join me Thursday, November 16 from 3:00-4:00pm EST for a free webinar presented by myself and Elizabeth A. Ayello, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, ETN, MAPWCA, FAAN sponsored by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP), entitled, Unavoidable Pressure Injuries, Terminal Ulceration, and Skin Failure: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
repositioning for pressure injury prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are extremely prevalent, particularly in long-term and other care facilities, and primarily affect older adults, those with cognitive impairment, mobility issues or individuals who are bedfast. Understanding the best ways to prevent skin damage before it develops into a significant injury is critical to improving patient outcomes and reducing costs.1 This brief guide will introduce nurses and other health care professionals to pressure injury prevention best practices to reduce the risk of patients’ developing these preventable wounds.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
pressure injury prevention and management

by the WoundSource Editors

Nurses and other health care professionals providing care to patients regularly face challenges that can make it more difficult to perform routine tasks and ensure patient comfort and well-being, especially with regard to pressure ulcer/injury prevention and treatment. From a lack of mobility to chronic diseases, these challenges often coincide and interplay, creating unique risks and complications in managing the care of patients.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
pressure injury treatment

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are among the most costly and prevalent conditions faced by health care professionals. It is estimated that in the United States alone, pressure injuries cost up to $11.6 billion each year with an estimated per-injury cost of $20,900 to $151,700.1 The elderly, individuals with chronic conditions such as diabetes, and those with limited mobility are significantly more likely to develop pressure injuries than other patients. It is extremely important that health care professionals understand best practice treatments to help reduce the severity and longevity of these wounds.

Cheryl Carver's picture


Incorrect staging of pressure injuries can cause many types of repercussions. Incorrect documentation can also be worse than no documentation. Pressure injuries and staging mistakes are avoidable, so educating clinicians how to stage with confidence is the goal.

Cheryl Carver's picture
fat grafting for pressure injuries


This month's blog topic idea came about from a recent conversation with a middle-aged patient with paraplegia. She had a stage 4 pressure injury due to being in her wheelchair long hours, along with a low BMI. I made the comment, "I wish I could give you a fat transplant." She laughed. She then asked, "Well, why not?" Later that day the topic of fat grafting popped up on social media in a spinal cord injury group I follow. I ended up chatting with a few spinal cord injury folks that were serious about coming up with funds to get fat grafting done. They all had a fear of, or a previous history of pressure injuries. These folks with past pressure injuries had used advanced wound care dressings, support surfaces, high-end cushions, supplements, negative pressure wound therapy, a slew of antibiotics, and even flap closures.

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
questions in wound care

On April 26, 2017, I presented a webinar on on the topic of Moisture-Associated Skin Damage (MASD). Afterwards, there was a Q&A session with the participants of the webinar. This is a selection of some of those questions and their answers.