Wound Healing

Nancy Munoz's picture
malnutrition and pressure injuries

by Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

Nutrition is a major determinant of health status. Food, as a vital source of nutrition, not only is essential to physiological well-being, but also impacts one's quality of life culturally, socially and psychologically.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
antibiotic resistant biofilm

by the WoundSource Editors

Identifying and managing biofilms have become two of the most important aspects of wound care. Biofilms can have a significant impact on wound healing, by contributing to bacterial infection, inflammation, and delayed wound healing.1 These issues make reducing biofilm presence a critical component of effective wound care.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
necrotic tissue in wound

by the WoundSource Editors

Biofilm is a complex microbial community containing self- and surface-attached microorganisms that are embedded in an extracellular polymeric substance. The extracellular polymeric substance is a primarily polysaccharide protective matrix synthesized and secreted by the microorganisms that attaches the biofilm firmly to a living or non-living surface. This protective covering does not allow the body's immune system to recognize the presence of the microorganism; therefore, the bacteria evade an immune response, avoid detection by standard diagnostic techniques, and avoid destruction by standard treatments.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Diabetes and wound healing

For individuals with diabetes, all wounds are a serious health concern and require careful attention. Because of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, skin cuts and blisters often go unnoticed until they become more complicated to heal. In addition, internal wounds such as ingrown toenails, skin ulcers, or calluses can cause breakdown of tissue and an increased risk of infection. Even small cuts and insect bites can cause wound healing difficulties in patients with diabetes. Here are common factors of diabetes that impact wound healing:

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Martin Vera's picture
chronic wounds

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

What is a chronic wound? What changes must happen within a wound for clinicians to classify it as "chronic"? Is there a time frame for healing chronic wounds? And what should we clinicians do to prevent and/or reverse chronic wounds? These are all great questions that keep us on our toes, from the dedicated seasoned clinician to the clinicians new to our field. In this blog I will define what a chronic wound is, what it consists of, and whether there is a way to convert or reverse a wound.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
pressure injury treatment

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are among the most costly and prevalent conditions faced by health care professionals. It is estimated that in the United States alone, pressure injuries cost up to $11.6 billion each year with an estimated per-injury cost of $20,900 to $151,700.1 The elderly, individuals with chronic conditions such as diabetes, and those with limited mobility are significantly more likely to develop pressure injuries than other patients. It is extremely important that health care professionals understand best practice treatments to help reduce the severity and longevity of these wounds.

WoundSource Editors's picture
wound healing

The Wound Healing Process

Promoting the wound healing process is a primary responsibility for most health care practitioners. It can take 1-3 days for a closed wound to actually establish a seal. Infections usually occur in 3-6 days but may not appear for up to 30 days, according to the CDC guidelines for preventing surgical infections.

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Tissue Analytics's picture
wound care assessment system

by Amanda Steinhauser, LVN, WCC

Everyone has heard the numbers; wound care costs in the United States are reported to be in excess of fifty billion dollars annually. Moreover, more than six million Americans suffer from chronic wounds. According to the American Diabetes Association, over one million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. Despite these jaw-dropping statistics, wound care assessment techniques remain, for the majority, one of the most antiquated parts of health care.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Zinc in wound healing

by Aletha Tippett MD

Well, what a surprise to find that what you have been doing all along is really the right thing to do even though you didn’t know the reason. Always, over the years doing wound care, I applied a thick layer of zinc oxide ointment around the patient’s wound, then put my dressing on the wound and covered it with a topping, usually plastic wrap pressed into the zinc oxide ointment.

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Martin Vera's picture
venous assessment

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Wound clinicians across the nation (and the world) are commonly faced with the difficult task of managing lower extremity wounds. Lower extremity wounds come in many different forms. We are not faced with a generic type, but several—in fact, we never know what we'll be presented with day-to-day.

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