Education

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Wound Care Certification

Holly M. Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN-CNS, CWOCN-AP

Not many people wake up one day and say, "Wow, I really want to be a continence nurse!" In fact, sometimes people don't even really understand what a continence nurse is, their role, or the specialty in general. I often tell nurses that although we may not all hold certification, every nurse should be a continence nurse, especially in the long-term care setting.

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Wound Care Certification

By Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As discussed in a prior blog, reflecting on why you want to become certified and how to begin the process are some important initial steps when considering certification. Understanding certification, how it relates to or potentially changes your current position and employer recognition are some important initial considerations as well. Certification is a mark of professionalism and a designation as an expert in your field of practice. After deciding on a certifying body that aligns with your goals and values, and those of your employer, the next step is to prepare for the exam.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Cellulitis: A common bacterial skin infection that appears as a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot and tender; also known as lymphangitis. Treatment should begin promptly to avoid having the infection spread rapidly and become life-threatening.

Complete decongestive therapy (CDT): The system of lymphedema treatment that includes manual lymph drainage (MLD), compression techniques, decongestive exercise, and self-care training.

Congenital lymphedema: A form of primary lymphedema that is present from birth; also known as Milroy's disease or Nonne-Milroy disease.

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Chronic Wounds

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

In my recent WoundSource webinar, I discussed the topic of chronic wound etiology and management. The webinar is still available for viewing on WoundSource.com. Chronic wounds are vexing and frustrating to manage; they can be expensive and are a huge source of morbidity and mortality. Infection prevention is a key part of chronic wound management, with recognition of the role that biofilms play.

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Wound Chronicity

by the WoundSource Editors

Chronic wounds affect over 6.5 million people annually in the United States, with a total cost of over $26.8 billion per year. Proper identification of chronic wounds is necessary to develop an effective treatment plan, although many elements—such as intrinsic and extrinsic factors, comorbidities, and mixed etiologies—may complicate this process.

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Venous Leg Ulcer

by Karen Bauer , NP-C, CWS

In my recent WoundSource webinar on management strategies of venous leg ulcers (VLU), I discussed the complex pathophysiology of VLUs and procedural interventions that can help them reach closure.

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Pressure Injury

by the WoundSource Editors

Wound healing is a complex process that is highly dependent on many skin cell types interacting in a defined order. With chronic wounds, this process is disrupted, and healing does not normally progress. Although there are different types of chronic wounds, those occurring from injury, such as skin tears or pressure injuries, are some of the most common. These injuries are a result of repeated mechanical irritation. Moisture-associated skin damage is another condition that can contribute to chronicity. Understanding the causes and contributors to these injuries can help to minimize patients’ risk of developing them. It can also aid in the formation of an optimal treatment plan for when injuries do occur, which reduces the healing time and leads to better patient outcomes.

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Biofilm Management

by the WoundSource Editors

The returning wound patient is in for reassessment. They are positioned for maximum visualization of the wound. You remove the dressing. Clean the wound. After a few additional steps, it's time to measure the wound's progress. Using your measurement tool, you take careful note of the wound’s measurements. In comparing the measurement with the previous visits, you realize that the wound has stalled out.

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Chronic Wounds

by the WoundSource Editors

In approaching the management of a chronic wound, the first step in developing a treatment plan that will combat chronicity and promote healthy healing of damaged tissue begins with understanding the different types of wounds.

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By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

So, you’ve selected the support surface that is perfect for the resident. What’s next? Next steps: education, utilization, reassessment, and repeat. So many questions! Remember, as I have said before, nothing here is common sense, only common knowledge. It is your responsibility to make sure the staff left in charge of the direct care of residents has that knowledge. Think basics!