Education

Holly Hovan's picture
Pressure Injury Prevention

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

What does your facility do to raise awareness regarding pressure injury prevention? We have lots of educational opportunities throughout the year, but one of our most important and prepared for days is the third Thursday in November – World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day! This is a day to raise awareness that has been promoted by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP). Every year, the NPUAP puts out a press release and lots of good information in terms of ways to educate and engage staff on such an important topic, on a national level.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Preventing Caregiver Burnout

Paula Erwin Toth, RN, MSN, FAAN
WOC nurse

November is National Family Caregiver Month. Family caregivers are the unsung heroes of the health care team. Without their loving care, hard work, and dedication our health care delivery system would crash and burn. They are the ones continuing our plans of care in the home. They are the nurse, physician, physical therapist, nursing assistant, home health aide, counselor, and social worker all rolled into one. They are expected to grasp complex care techniques that years ago were carried out only in the hospital.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Interdisciplinary Journal Club

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Wound, ostomy, continence (WOC) nurses wear many hats. A significant role that we play is that of an educator, both with our patients and with our staff. I'm sure we've all heard "How on earth did you ever get interested in wounds? What made you want to be a wound specialist?" or similar comments. There are so many specialties in nursing, so why this one? For me, it is about helping others.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Calciphylaxis – A disorder—generally found in end stage renal disease but not limited to renal patients—with widespread calcification of small and medium-sized vessels that leads to occlusion, thrombosis, and tissue necrosis. Extreme cases can be life-threatening.

Martin Vera's picture
Wound Assessment

By Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Throughout my career I have been lucky enough to be part of several nursing branches: home health, long-term care, acute care, long-term acute care hospital, hospice, and even a tuberculosis hospital; wounds have no limitations on where they will appear. As a passionate clinician, teaching, coaching, and mentoring have become a huge part of what I do, as is true for most clinicians. We are teachers, coaches, and mentors driven by passion and wanting to help and put in our “two clinical cents” or “stamp” on the industry.

Susan Cleveland's picture
Support Surfaces

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 1 in a two-part series looking at the basics of correctly using support surfaces to help redistribute pressure. Read Part 2 here.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Acute Wound: A wound that is following a predicted pattern of healing that should result in complete functional closure.

Chronic Wound: A wound that has failed to re-epithelialize after three months, usually because of failure to progress past the inflammatory phase of wound healing.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Evaluating Patient Risk Factors

by the WoundSource Editors

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most prevalent surgical wound complications, comprising approximately 15% of all health care–associated infections, with more than 500,000 reported yearly.1 Preventing SSIs is perhaps the best way to prevent further surgical wound complications.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Wound

by the WoundSource Editors

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate approximately 30 million surgical procedures are performed annually in the United States.1 Advances in technology have afforded patients options such as minimally invasive surgery, commonly known as laparoscopic or arthroscopic surgery, which tend to result in much smaller (1cm–2cm) incisions.