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Industry Voices

Industry Voices is a blog channel that connects health care companies with WoundSource readers. Sharing in WoundSource's mission to advance the practice of wound management, Industry Voices' sponsors share their expertise, advancements and perspectives on wound care and related topics. All content is developed and paid for by the sponsoring company. WoundSource is not involved in the creation of this content.

Michel Hermans's picture
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By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

How should I treat a patient with a partial-thickness burn on less than 10% of their body but poor vascularity?

It is not possible to give a specific answer to this question because burns larger than 10% could be anywhere from 11% to 99%. As mentioned in the presentation, larger burns cause burn disease with all its potential complications. “Poor vascularity” is a bit vague. If it is the result of diabetes, then the disease itself, including the typical microvascular problems, will contribute to poorer healing. On the other hand, peripheral arterial disease usually does not have a significant impact on the healing of partial-thickness burns unless occlusion is very severe.

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By: Dianne Rudolph, DNP, GNP-BC, CWOCN

What are some ways to achieve insurance coverage for fistula pouches or to use ostomy supplies for a fistula? We often run into the issue of supplies not being covered for Medicare or Medicaid patients.

Unfortunately, coverage is inadequate. CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) coverage for fistulas is limited for fistulas caused by or resulting from a surgical procedure, and even then, it may be difficult to get reimbursed. Spontaneous fistulas (15% to 25%) are generally not covered. The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Society is working on trying to effect a change in coverage. Some insurance companies may be more amenable to reimbursement, and it may require a case-by-case application or appeal. For patients being discharged home, it may be possible to secure a short-term supply of 10 to 14 days. The cost for the pouches may run $255 and up for a box of 10.

WoundCon Faculty's picture

By: Mary Brennan, RN, MBA, CWON, Karen Lou Kennedy-Evans, RN, FNP, APRN-BC, and Diane Krasner, PhD, RN, CWCN, CWS, MAPWCA, FAAN

First Quality Products's picture

By: M. Sanantonio RN, C. Gunner RN, S. Trousaant LVN, M. Moore LVN

It is important for skilled nursing facilities to utilize quality incontinent products for their residents that are facing the daily challenges of both bladder and bowel incontinence. However, products alone do not make for a successful continence management program. It is imperative that the caregivers receive education in multiple areas that ultimately have an effect on the resident’s quality of life, quality outcomes and overall facility cost efficiencies. This study demonstrates the combination of quality incontinent products and education and its overall effectiveness in skilled nursing facilities.

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Management Strategies for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By Hy-Tape International

According to a published study, the global prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is 6.3%, with male patients and older adults being the most likely to be affected.1 This prevalence, coupled with the potential for complications and the severe effect on quality of life the condition can have, makes DFUs one of today's most serious health care issues. To reduce the effects of DFUs and improve outcomes for patients, it is critical that health care professionals rapidly identify DFUs and implement best practice dressing and management strategies.

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Secondary Dressings

By Hy-Tape International, Inc.

Secondary dressings can be an effective tool to protect the primary dressing or provide additional functionality beyond the primary dressing. Hydrocolloid or foam dressings can provide protection for the wound area and manage excess exudate. However, they can also significantly add to the cost and time of wound care. This makes it critical that health care professionals implement effective practices to maximize the wear time of secondary dressings.

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Neonatal skin

By Hy-Tape International, Inc.

Infants pose a major challenge for wound care professionals. Because neonatal skin is immature and thin compared with adult skin, it is more easily damaged and requires greater care. This makes it critical that health care professionals follow specialized best practices when caring for neonatal wounds to minimize skin damage and ensure optimal outcomes for patients.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Contact Dermatitis

by Hy-Tape International, Inc.

Contact dermatitis is a major concern for health care professionals involved in wound management. The condition can have a significant impact on patients' well-being and can lead to pain, increased risk of infection, and delayed wound healing. These issues can significantly affect both the costs of wound care and patients' outcomes. It is critical that health care professionals make reducing the risk of contact dermatitis a top priority by using safe and gentle wound care products and following wound care best practices.

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Preventing Cross-Infection

by Hy-Tape International

Infections are common and serious complications associated with post-surgical wounds. In wounds resulting from clean surgery, 8% become infected among the general population and 25% among those over 60 years of age. Preventing these infections can help reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and save lives. It is critical that health care professionals understand the risk of cross-contamination and take steps to prevent it.

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