Outcomes

Diana Gallagher's picture
wound care deserts

by Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

Last month, the news shared two important stories that were closely linked. Walmart announced the closing of 102 Walmart Express stores as part of their overall restructuring and statistical analyses revealed the states with the highest levels of obesity. These two stories prompted discussions about food deserts and their tie to obesity.

Food deserts are identified as areas without easy access to healthy food choices. They have been thought to be a contributing factor for obesity and the cascade of comorbidities that are tied to it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have funded Prevention Research Centers (PRC) in an attempt to ensure healthy food options in neighborhood markets. The lack of readily available fresh fruits, vegetables and lean protein options is problematic in some communities. The existing research, however, is not clear and more research is needed.

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Michel Hermans's picture
monitoring the healing time of partial-thickness burns

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Recently I paid a visit to one of the better known wound care centers in the North East. As I expected, treatment of the common lesions seen in these centers, such as venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers, was top notch. The use of compression and offloading, proper wound debridement and modern dressings (including, where indicated, biologics and matrices), in combination with the option for vascular, plastic and orthopedic (i.e. for Charcot foot) reconstruction resulted in good healing results, with high percentages of reepithelialization within a relatively short time frame.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Wound Management Technology

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

What's the best approach to wound management: use of the latest advanced technology or "back to basics" treatment methods? How many times have you, the experienced wound clinician, been asked this question? It is only natural for people (especially patients and their families) to gravitate to a solution that seems to offer a quick fix for a very complex problem.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Caregiver and Client

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

Fall is in full swing. The leaves in Ohio are just past their full glory, the Cleveland Browns are having another disappointing season and the debate about health care reform goes on. In other words, not much has changed from the past several years. Our clients with chronic wounds may feel the same: different day, different year, same problems with no end in sight. One wound may have healed only to recur or another erupt in a different location.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Scalpels

by Aletha Tippett MD

Typical treatment when osteomyelitis (bone infection) is discovered is to plan a surgical treatment, usually wide debridement, but up to and including amputation. I was recently treating an 80-year-old with a wound on her foot that was healing very well. But she went to a hospital for a UTI and they found osteomyelitis under that foot wound. After much discussion they convinced her amputation was the only way, so her leg was amputated and she is now in a nursing home.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Patient and Provider

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

As summer gives way to fall, one of the first thoughts most of us have is back to school. Patients and caregivers often feel as though every day is the first day of school and they are being asked to take the final exam before they have learned anything. Learner readiness is the cornerstone of an effective teaching/learning process.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
stopwatch

by Aletha Tippett MD

Wound cleansing is an interesting dilemma. What? How can that be a dilemma? Everyone knows that you cleanse a wound before dressing it. This is what has been taught for years. Wound cleansing began in the late 19th or early 20th century once the germ theory was proposed and accepted, and hygiene was successful in reducing infections and death, and improving wound outcomes.

Margaret Heale's picture
Holding hands

My perspective is a little different as I was a matron in a British hospital in the 70s. Perspective gives the mind greater depth and a more complete understanding of the nature of what we see. You may think that nursing is the same wherever you go, but of course culture and history mold us differently when there is time and distance between us. Here, at this skilled nursing facility I watch, listen and help where I can.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Resolution List

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN
Several years ago I made a New Year's resolution to stop making New Year's resolutions. Like most New Year's resolutions I have not had much success in keeping it. Therefore I am sharing a few resolutions.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Writing up a case report is an important professional activity in not only wound care, but in any other field as well. A case report records the details of the presentation of signs and symptoms, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of a patient case or series of cases. Case reports typically describe an unusual presentation or complication relating to the patient's condition, or a new clinical approach to a common problem. The publication of a case report in a peer-reviewed journal, if that is your intent, is a great addition to your CV, especially if you are new to the profession.

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