Outcomes

Kathi Thimsen's picture

by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Hydrogel dressings were one of the first wound care products to change the practice of drying out wounds using caustic agents. Hydrogels drove home the advanced theory of Dr. George D. Winter, referred to as “moist wound healing.” Winter was the scientist that identified and validated the theory that by providing a moist wound environment, the outcomes for patients were those of faster healing and stronger regenerated wounds tissue, with less scarring and pain.

Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

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Michael Miller's picture

by Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 2

I recently recognized a puzzling aspect of my wound care practice; I am just not seeing that many infected wounds. Moreover, I seem to use much fewer antibiotics and antimicrobial agents than almost everybody else I know practicing in wound care.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

Every six minutes, somewhere in the United States, someone loses a limb due to amputation because of peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy can cause pain, balance problems, loss of dexterity, and loss of sensation, all of which can lead to foot ulcers.

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Diane Krasner's picture

From The Clinical Editor

by Diane Krasner PhD, RN, CWCN, CWS, MAPWCA, FAAN

Introduction

The push towards safety by regulators and payers reflects the evidence that safe healthcare practices have numerous benefits – from reducing sentinel events to improving quality outcomes and helping to avoid litigation (1, 2, 3, 4). The wound care community has been slow to adopt the safety mantra . . . but the time has come to put your “safety lenses” on and to view wound prevention and treatment as a safety issue.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, FACCWS

Heels are particularly vulnerable to skin breakdown. The posterior heel is only covered by a thin layer of skin and fat, and that makes breakdown a very real risk. When patients lie supine, all of the pressure of their lower legs and feet rest on the heels, which have relatively poor skin perfusion and a paucity of muscle tissue to absorb stress.

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