Patient Issues

Diana Gallagher's picture

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

I have always prided myself on my ability to place patients' needs as a top priority. Patients are people and each and every one is an individual. They have unique needs and desires. Their levels of education, both formal and life lessons, varies greatly. They relate to me and communicate with me on different levels. They may have the same need for education, but they each learn differently. Although there are commonalities, the differences are significant. All people appreciate knowing that they are a priority and that they matter. Admittedly, making every patient a priority is a juggling act at times. It clearly takes extra time and effort but going the extra mile has always been worth it. I believe that doing the right thing the first time saves time and effort in the long run.

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

The signs of summer winding down are everywhere. Leaves are beginning to look 'tired', fall clothes fill the stores and 'back to school' ads are everywhere—to the chagrin of kids and joy of parents everywhere.

Blog Category: 
Michel Hermans's picture
Keywords: 

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Merriam Webster defines bias as "selecting or encouraging one outcome or answer over others." The Cochrane handbook states: "The reliability of the results of a randomized trial depends on the extent to which potential sources of bias have been avoided."

Blog Category: 
Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

If you could trade places with one person for one day, who would it be? Your first thought may be an Olympian, celebrity, or even a superhero. Who wouldn't want to be awarded a gold medal, walk the red carpet, or wear a cape to soar above the big city? One thing remains certain, not one of us would choose to be one of our wound care patients. There is definitely nothing appealing about having a chronic wound.

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

I hope this missive finds all of you safe and warm. For many, this has been an exceptionally brutal winter. Blizzards, ice storms, avalanches and a drought. All that is missing are zombie snowmen and a plague of locusts.

Blog Category: 
Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA, WCC

We have all seen the use of the term "Entitlement Mentality" in the media. Liberals decry its use by pointing out that the government has a duty to all citizens to assure that all people have the same rights. This argument tends to fall short when there is juxtaposition of families with multiple generations of "welfare" against those who chose to delay gratification to further their educations and become health care professionals and other occupations of service. We have all seen patients whose corpulence rivals that of Jabba the Hut and wondered not only how someone could allow themselves to mutate into such a state but more, how their loved ones could allow it. Of course, in the grand scheme of things, it does make for interesting reality television. Like the 55 year old male who had the equivalent of a '57 Chevy bypassed from him. Let's face it–regardless of how mechanistic you would like to believe we all are, regardless of your occupation, personal feelings always play a role. If not, then why would it matter if there were Republicans or Democrats sitting on our judiciary, as shouldn't the laws be interpreted based on their meaning and relationship to the US constitution and Bill of Rights and not which President appointed you to the bench?

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

As we say goodbye to 2013 and usher in 2014, most of us reflect on the past and plan for the future. What does 2014 mean when we look ahead to wound care? This past year saw health care dominating the news in the USA; add a government shutdown, political divisiveness that polarized and in some cases paralyzed the nation, and of course continued worldwide economic and political upheavals, and the overall challenges can seem overwhelming.

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

I hope everyone is doing well in the midst of challenging world and domestic events. I was having a discussion with my 7-year-old grandson and was amazed at what young minds pick up on and how they interpret world events. He was discussing the possibilities of World War III and checked out a book on modern ground weapons from the library. I listened, respected his efforts to express his understanding of chemical weapons, terrorism and war and yet tried to offer information and reassurance.

Blog Category: 
Karen Zulkowski's picture

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

All medical personnel strive to provide care based on the strongest available evidence. Yet how many of us provide culturally competent care? Culturally competent care is defined as having specific cognitive and effective skills that are essential for building culturally-relevant relationships between patients and providers.1 We may know about local customs but in today’s global world our patients may be from a different area of the world. So how would you react if your Asian patient wanted to use non-traditional medicine or your patient of the Sikh faith refused to remove their underpants prior to surgery?

Blog Category: 
Karen Zulkowski's picture

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

I have talked about treating wounds, assessing wounds and care planning, but have not discussed the patient as a person. I always talk to the patient and family about options for care, how aggressive they want to be in their treatment plan and explain to them what I am doing and why I am doing it. The importance of this communication process is one of the reasons why I got involved in the Wound App project. I realized rural facilities don’t have wound expertise available and additional testing may mean many miles of travel. The consultation plan calls for patient/family involvement. But the communication with the patient and family is important regardless of how or where you are doing wound care.

Blog Category: