Skin Conditions

Hy-Tape International's picture
Skin Tear

by Hy-Tape International

Skin tears are a costly and increasingly common condition affecting a large number of patients, particularly older adults. These injuries can be caused by excessive friction, shearing, or blunt forces, causing a partial- or full-thickness wound. Although they are generally considered to be minor injuries, skin tears can lead to more serious complications and exacerbate existing wounds. To ensure that the costs of skin tears do not become too great, and that patients stay healthy, it is critical that health care professionals understand the risks of skin tearing and take preventative action to reduce those risks.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Geriatric Skin

by Holly M. Hovan, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With a growing population of Americans aged 65 or older, it is important to know what skin changes are normal and abnormal and what we can do in terms of treatment, education, and prevention of skin injuries.

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Sharon Baronoski's picture
Obesity

by Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN-CCNS, FAAN and Kimberly LeBlanc, PhD, RN, WOCC©, IIWCC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that in the United States, "...thirty eight percent of adults, and that seventeen percent of children and teens are obese." It is imperative that the term obesity be differentiated from overweight. Obesity refers to higher than normal body fat, whereas overweight is in reference to an individual weighing more than the standard for height and weight. Although both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what is considered healthy for his or her height, obesity has higher negative health-related consequences.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Causes of Incontinence

by Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With World Continence Week upon us, it is an appropriate time to discuss some types and causes along with treatment of urinary incontinence. The most common types of incontinence that we learn about are stress, urge, mixed (stress and urge), transient, neurogenic, and functional.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

As many as one-quarter to one-third of adults are living with incontinence. Risk factors include: age, obesity, childbirth, and prostate enlargement. Not being able to control leaking urine is embarrassing and can even cause people to limit daily activities and prevent them from enjoying life. Here are some ways medical professionals can support patients living with incontinence.

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Susan Cleveland's picture
Moisture-Associated Skin Damage Prevention

by Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a prevalent complication of incontinence that compromises skin integrity, predisposes patients to cutaneous infection, and increases pressure ulcer risk. IAD is an inflammation of the skin as a result of long-term or repeated exposure to urine or feces. Reported IAD incidence rates in long-term care settings vary from 3.4% to 25% and up to 65% in the presence of double incontinence (urine and stool).

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Susan Cleveland's picture
Preventing MASD by Moving

by Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

The long-term care setting has changed over the years: it has become an even more concerning issue because our population is no longer just older adults looking for a place to age, but now includes a wave of acutely ill individuals with multiple comorbidities. And yet despite these changes, skin issues continue to be a problem. Moisture from any source increases the skin’s permeability and decreases the barrier function. The outmost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, is normally slightly acidic and protects the body from pathogens when intact. If the skin is compromised by moisture or moisture with friction, a break in the surface can allow pathogens to enter.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

It has long been known in clinical practice that long-term exposure of the skin to moisture is harmful and can lead to extensive skin breakdown. The term moisture-associated skin damage was coined as an umbrella term to describe the spectrum of skin damage that can occur over time and under various circumstances. To have a moisture-associated skin condition, there must be moisture that comes in contact with that skin.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
incontinence-associate dermatitis prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Although clinical practice is hampered by a lack of rigorous studies, standardized terminology, or definitions of incontinence-associated skin damage, it is well known among health care providers that this damage places patients at increased risk for pressure ulcer/injury development.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
complications associated with MASD

by the WoundSource Editors

Best practice in skin care focuses on the prevention of skin breakdown and the treatment of persons with altered skin integrity. When we ask what causes skin damage we should consider the conditions that can harm the skin, including excessive moisture and overhydration, altered pH of the skin, the presence of fecal enzymes and pathogens, and characteristics of incontinence such as the volume and frequency of the output and whether the output is urine, feces, or both