Skin Conditions

Cheryl Carver's picture
Terminology

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

It is 2018, and health care professionals around the world are still debating what to call skin damage. I totally immersed myself in wound care because of losing my 47-year-old mother to what was then called "decubitus ulcers." I was young when my mother died, and I wanted to know why and how this could happen. My perspective is different from that of most clinicians because of my personal experience.

My purpose in writing this blog is not only to share my opinion but also to shed a different light on this controversy. There have been many debates at conferences, in the workplace, and on social media forums. After all of these discussions, there doesn't seem to be an easy answer. Based on this dissension, we need not only to establish the correct term but also to make revisions to the staging system itself. Some argue that if you change the term, the definitions automatically change. There have been some revisions, but are they enough?

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Cathy Wogamon's picture
Veteran with Spinal Cord Injury

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

Immobility and decreased sensation can cause major problems related to the skin in the patient with spinal cord injury. Even though the average age of the veteran with a spinal cord injury is increasing, there are still many younger veterans affected by spinal cord injuries. When skin issues arise in this population, the impact is not only physical but also emotional as skin issues sometimes make it difficult for the veteran to remain in their chairs, thereby decreasing mobility and socialization.

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Skin Tear

by Hy-Tape International

Skin tears are a costly and increasingly common condition affecting a large number of patients, particularly older adults. These injuries can be caused by excessive friction, shearing, or blunt forces, causing a partial- or full-thickness wound. Although they are generally considered to be minor injuries, skin tears can lead to more serious complications and exacerbate existing wounds. To ensure that the costs of skin tears do not become too great, and that patients stay healthy, it is critical that health care professionals understand the risks of skin tearing and take preventative action to reduce those risks.

Holly Hovan's picture
Geriatric Skin

by Holly M. Hovan, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With a growing population of Americans aged 65 or older, it is important to know what skin changes are normal and abnormal and what we can do in terms of treatment, education, and prevention of skin injuries.

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Sharon Baronoski's picture
Obesity

by Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN-CCNS, FAAN and Kimberly LeBlanc, PhD, RN, WOCC©, IIWCC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that in the United States, "...thirty eight percent of adults, and that seventeen percent of children and teens are obese." It is imperative that the term obesity be differentiated from overweight. Obesity refers to higher than normal body fat, whereas overweight is in reference to an individual weighing more than the standard for height and weight. Although both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what is considered healthy for his or her height, obesity has higher negative health-related consequences.

Holly Hovan's picture
Causes of Incontinence

by Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With World Continence Week upon us, it is an appropriate time to discuss some types and causes along with treatment of urinary incontinence. The most common types of incontinence that we learn about are stress, urge, mixed (stress and urge), transient, neurogenic, and functional.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

As many as one-quarter to one-third of adults are living with incontinence. Risk factors include: age, obesity, childbirth, and prostate enlargement. Not being able to control leaking urine is embarrassing and can even cause people to limit daily activities and prevent them from enjoying life. Here are some ways medical professionals can support patients living with incontinence.

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Susan Cleveland's picture
Moisture-Associated Skin Damage Prevention

by Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a prevalent complication of incontinence that compromises skin integrity, predisposes patients to cutaneous infection, and increases pressure ulcer risk. IAD is an inflammation of the skin as a result of long-term or repeated exposure to urine or feces. Reported IAD incidence rates in long-term care settings vary from 3.4% to 25% and up to 65% in the presence of double incontinence (urine and stool).

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Susan Cleveland's picture
Preventing MASD by Moving

by Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

The long-term care setting has changed over the years: it has become an even more concerning issue because our population is no longer just older adults looking for a place to age, but now includes a wave of acutely ill individuals with multiple comorbidities. And yet despite these changes, skin issues continue to be a problem. Moisture from any source increases the skin’s permeability and decreases the barrier function. The outmost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, is normally slightly acidic and protects the body from pathogens when intact. If the skin is compromised by moisture or moisture with friction, a break in the surface can allow pathogens to enter.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

It has long been known in clinical practice that long-term exposure of the skin to moisture is harmful and can lead to extensive skin breakdown. The term moisture-associated skin damage was coined as an umbrella term to describe the spectrum of skin damage that can occur over time and under various circumstances. To have a moisture-associated skin condition, there must be moisture that comes in contact with that skin.