Skin Conditions/Skin Care

Heidi Cross's picture
Unavoidable Pressure Ulcers

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

"At all times material hereto, defendant failed to develop an adequate care plan and properly monitor and supervise the care and treatment in order to prevent her from suffering the development and deterioration of bed sores."

Holly Hovan's picture
Braden Scale: Mobility

By Holly Hovan, MSN, RN-BC, APRN-CNS, CWOCN-AP

What is mobility? Typically, when we hear the word mobility, we think about our ability to move, with or without assistance. In a long-term care setting, we often hear the words, "mobility aids," which are typically pieces of medical equipment that are used to enhance mobility—wheelchairs, walkers, canes, power wheelchairs, crutches, and even guide dogs for those who are sight impaired. There are many intrinsic and extrinsic factors that impact one's mobility, which will be discussed in this blog.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Neonatal skin

By Hy-Tape International, Inc.

Infants pose a major challenge for wound care professionals. Because neonatal skin is immature and thin compared with adult skin, it is more easily damaged and requires greater care. This makes it critical that health care professionals follow specialized best practices when caring for neonatal wounds to minimize skin damage and ensure optimal outcomes for patients.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Skin and Wound Management with Substance Abuse

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

The challenges for all clinicians associated with substance abuse and addiction are at an all-time high. We are seeing more and more overdoses and skin and wound issues. There needs to be less judgment and more education. Not every person with substance abuse issues is addicted due to a poor choice. Reasons for abuse can be related to unmanaged mental illness, self-medication and family genetics, to name a few. Compassion is lacking for this group of folks. I have seen it firsthand. This topic hits close to home as I have a son in recovery. This problem is an epidemic and needs to be talked about more. I live in Ohio, and we are one of the top five states for heroin and methamphetamine (meth) abuse.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: Stem Cells Derived from Burned Skin – The Future of Burn Care
Authors: Saeid Amini-Nik; Reinhard Dolp; Gertraud Eylert; Andrea-Kaye Datu; Alexandra Parousis; Camille Blakeley; Marc G. Jeschke (Sunnybrook Research Institute, Canada)
Journal: EBioMedicine
Reviewed by: Akhil Korrapati, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Class of 2021, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

WoundSource Editors's picture
Keywords: 
Edema

By the WoundSource Editors

Edema is swelling that occurs when there is an excessive amount of fluids within the intracellular space, typically within subcutaneous tissues. Edema is more commonly experienced in the lower extremities and other areas that are farther from the heart. Edema may be dependent, caused by gravitational forces on the fluids that are greater than the mechanisms designed to overcome these forces. Edema may also be generalized throughout the entire body or localized, restricted to a single area.

Emily Greenstein's picture
Keywords: 
Morgellons Disease

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON

I recently presented this topic as a Journal Club presentation for the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care Members. I feel like this is a very important and interesting subject, so I wanted to share it with more people. Morgellons disease (MD) is a disorder that can be considered controversial. One view of it is that the disorder is purely a psychological condition, and the other view is that the disorder is actually a byproduct of another infectious process. My goal is to give you some facts from both sides and allow you to make your own decision.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Pressure Injury

by the WoundSource Editors

Wound healing is a complex process that is highly dependent on many skin cell types interacting in a defined order. With chronic wounds, this process is disrupted, and healing does not normally progress. Although there are different types of chronic wounds, those occurring from injury, such as skin tears or pressure injuries, are some of the most common. These injuries are a result of repeated mechanical irritation. Moisture-associated skin damage is another condition that can contribute to chronicity. Understanding the causes and contributors to these injuries can help to minimize patients’ risk of developing them. It can also aid in the formation of an optimal treatment plan for when injuries do occur, which reduces the healing time and leads to better patient outcomes.

Ivy Razmus's picture
Age and Pressure Injury

By Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

The very old and the very young are more alike than you might think when you consider risk for skin injuries. They are alike regarding their limited sensory perception, mobility, and activity. They are also alike in their potential for inadequate nutrition and their skin's supporting structures (muscle, collagen and elastin). These similarities place them at greater risk for pressure injuries.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Contact Dermatitis

by Hy-Tape International, Inc.

Contact dermatitis is a major concern for health care professionals involved in wound management. The condition can have a significant impact on patients' well-being and can lead to pain, increased risk of infection, and delayed wound healing. These issues can significantly affect both the costs of wound care and patients' outcomes. It is critical that health care professionals make reducing the risk of contact dermatitis a top priority by using safe and gentle wound care products and following wound care best practices.