Skin Conditions/Skin Care

Holly Hovan's picture
Keywords: 
elderly patient skin tear prevention

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

I'm sure you're all familiar with the terms "prednisone skin," "thin skin," "fragile skin," or "easily bruises." One or all of these phrases are commonly used to describe our geriatric population's aging skin. As we age, so does our skin. Skin loses elasticity and often gains wrinkles. Skin conditions that were maybe never present throughout life can crop up with aging. Keep in mind that the environment and different exposures (to sunlight, smoking, and stress) can cause our skin to age differently. Additionally, certain drugs, obesity, diet/lifestyle, habits, exercise, repetitive movements, and family history can also influence how our skin ages. Exposure to radiation (for cancer treatment) can also cause skin changes several years after treatment is complete. Regardless of the reason, as we age, our skin composition changes, and undoubtedly the risk for skin tears increases.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
questions in wound care

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

On April 26, 2017, I presented a webinar on the topic of Moisture-Associated Skin Damage (MASD) as part of WoundSource's webinar series on skin and wound related topics. MASD is a general term that encompasses a variety of skin injuries which involve excessive hydration of the skin. A strong knowledge of MASD can help clinicians in the assessment, prevention and treatment of the various types of moisture related skin injuries. During the informative presentation, I discussed such topics as:

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
literature review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
medical community discussion

By Jeffrey M. Levine MD, AGSF, CWS-P

As Co-Chair of the NPUAP Education Committee it is my pleasure to invite all clinicians to the NPUAP Biennial Conference in New Orleans from March 10 to 11, 2017. Featured topics will include best practices for staging and treatment, pressure injury recidivism, and pressure injury as a quality measure. In addition to these timely topics, NPUAP will host a full day featuring national experts who will discuss terminal ulceration, skin failure, and unavoidable pressure injury. Attendees are invited to submit cases that illustrate these lesions, and a select number of submissions will be presented for discussion with the group.

Martin Vera's picture
anatomy of the skin, the body's largest organ

By Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

On our last encounter we discussed wound bed preparation and the TIME framework. What I wish to accomplish with this post is to make it easier to understand the skin, the changes it undergoes as we age, and pave the way for the phases of wound healing—all of which are essential in becoming a better clinician.

Cheryl Carver's picture
fungi candida albicans 3D

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

It doesn't matter where exactly I am educating, I see it everywhere: the vicious cycle of chronic intertrigo and/or candida infections (candidiasis) of the skin in the long-term care arena. Skin and soft tissue infections are the third most common infection in long-term care.

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
skin care moisturizers

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGCNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

There are currently hundreds of skin moisturizing products on the market for clinicians to choose from. It is often difficult to wade through various brands and formulations to determine which is appropriate to treat a specific skin issue, and even more is involved in understanding the function of each ingredient. Protecting the body’s functional barrier is integral to staving off pathogens and defending the body from infection.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
dry skin and pressure ulcers

By Aletha Tippett MD

The other day I received a phone call from a dear physician friend of mine who works tirelessly in the field of pressure support and pressure ulcer prevention. He had been talking to some older nurses who told him that "in their day" they kept their patients lubed up and never had a skin problem. He knows that I advocate vigorous skin lubrication and sought guidance.

Diana Gallagher's picture
ostomy care 101

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

In order to teach patients, it is important to have some basic knowledge about ostomies. Sadly, as I shared last month, the majority of nursing students learn very little about ostomies or ostomy management. Most nurses have a good understanding of basic anatomy and physiology so this is not the focus of this blog. Instead, we are going to focus our attention on basic information that every nurse should know and competencies that every nurse should develop in order to provide quality care to their patients.

Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Being an independent wound care education consultant in long-term care, I get a lot of questions regarding moisture-associated skin damage (MASD). Is it MASD or a pressure ulcer? When do I change it from MASD to pressure ulcer in my documentation?