Wound Treatments

Thomas Serena's picture
Clinical Research

by Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

I have conducted numerous unblinded clinical trials, mostly evaluating cellular or tissue-based Products (CTPs). These trials do not easily lend themselves to blinding. However, when I slated this topic with the title “Unblinding the Blind" for my Association for the Advancement of Wound Care lecture track at next year’s spring Symposium on Advanced Wound Care, the organizers removed it and cited the lecture’s controversial nature. I thought that scientific research was the last frontier of free-wheeling discourse in the private sector, but here lurks the most challenging aspect of contemporary research in wound care: we woundologists do not demand increasing rigor in our trials. Outside of hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT) studies, we have not critically evaluated trial results.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are arguably among the most difficult types of wounds to manage; the etiology of these wounds poses some of the greatest clinical challenges for healing, considering the multifaceted nature of diabetes mellitus (DM). Multiple patient-related factors must be addressed and controlled through faithful adherence to the prescribed plan of care, which is developed by both the patient and clinicians to ensure success.

Hy-Tape International's picture
exudate management

By Hy-Tape International

Chronic venous insufficiency disease and resulting venous leg ulcers are serious and common conditions, particularly among older adults. More than half of lower extremity ulcers are caused by venous insufficiency disease. In a diseased venous system, the patient’s venous pressure will not be reduced on ambulation. This sustained pressure can lead to venous ulcerations and other complications.1,2

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Lidocaine Chemical Makeup

by Aletha Tippett MD

Well known for its pain-relieving properties, lidocaine can help us with wound care in many other ways. It has been my go-to product for wound care for over 20 years. I always use viscous lidocaine squirted on any dressing. The viscous lidocaine is what is prescribed for people to gargle for sore throats, so I always knew it was safe to put on a wound. It is wonderful for pain relief. A patient might need systemic pain relief also, but the application of topical lidocaine is very effective to help alleviate local pain of wounds.

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Margaret Heale's picture
home care nurse with patient

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

I watched a short PowerPoint DVD on the "bag technique" as part of our regular in-servicing the other day. The presentation started with the most important way to prevent cross infection—wash hands—which is fine. Then came the bag technique. I have no problem with the fundamentals of keeping your bag off the floor, only getting anything out of it after decontaminating your hands, and wiping before you store. I do have a problem with having to place the bag on a Chux or water-resistant wipeable or disposable surface, however.

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Martin Vera's picture
sickle cell anemia testing - atypical wound etiology assessment

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

Part 1 in a series discussing the etiology, assessment and management of atypical wounds.

As devoted clinicians to the field of wound management we take a responsibility to educate ourselves and others about wound etiologies and characteristics, as well as management of barriers to achieve positive outcomes. We spend a great deal of our careers learning about the most common offenders, such as pressure injuries, diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, arterial wounds, amputations, and traumatic wounds, to name a few. However, as our careers unfold we are faced with extra challenges, and atypical wounds are among them.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Within the last decade, the rise of diabetes in the U.S. population has been matched with a rise in diabetic foot ulcers requiring amputations. Because many of these diabetic foot ulcers develop secondary to poor wound healing and susceptibility to infection after surgery, some important risk factors have been evaluated. Stress, among other factors, has been shown not only to affect the psychological state of a patient, but also biologically to impair immunity and induce an inflammatory microenvironment within patients.

WoundSource Editors's picture
post-operative wound drainage

As health care professionals monitor the wound drainage of a patient, it is critical to be able to recognize the different types of wound drainage. Open wounds and incision wounds may both present varying types of exudate, some of which are perfectly healthy and others which can signal an infection or slow healing. Identifying wounds that need a change in care can speed the healing process. Here are the four main types of wound drainage health care professionals need to know.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
pressure injury treatment

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are among the most costly and prevalent conditions faced by health care professionals. It is estimated that in the United States alone, pressure injuries cost up to $11.6 billion each year with an estimated per-injury cost of $20,900 to $151,700.1 The elderly, individuals with chronic conditions such as diabetes, and those with limited mobility are significantly more likely to develop pressure injuries than other patients. It is extremely important that health care professionals understand best practice treatments to help reduce the severity and longevity of these wounds.

WoundSource Editors's picture
venous system

A venous ulcer, also known as a stasis ulcer or venous leg ulcer, is a shallow wound that usually occurs on the sides of the lower leg, between the calf and ankle. Since venous ulcers often are slow in healing and frequently recur if not properly treated, it is important for health care providers to understand their diagnosis and treatment.