Wound Treatments

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Chronic Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

The wound healing cascade is a complex process that follows a strict sequence of molecular events. The complex series of events depend on one another and must take place in a timely and orderly fashion within the body’s natural host processes. The phases of acute wound healing, in order, are hemostasis, inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation. If the cascade of events is interrupted, the acute wound status then develops into a non-healing or chronic status. Wound stalling occurs in the inflammatory and proliferative stages of healing. In chronic wounds, there appears to be an overproduction of matrix molecules resulting from underlying cellular dysfunction and dysregulation. Non-viable or devitalized tissue lengthens the inflammatory phase of healing and increases risk of infection.

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Patient Outcomes

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound chronicity is a major concern, and removing barriers with each stage of healing is paramount. Debridement may occur naturally by the body’s own ability to slough off dead tissue; however, often this tissue needs to be removed medically. The goal of wound debridement is to provide consistent wound bed preparation along with good healing outcomes. Removing non-viable tissue and foreign material is the first goal of debridement. Non-viable tissue not only inhibits the development of healthy new tissue but also increases the risk of infection. Non-viable tissue includes slough and eschar, which create the perfect recipe for bacterial growth and infection. Viable tissue is granulation and epithelial tissue, which is beneficial to normal healing. Wounds that present devitalized tissue and/or biofilm warrant one or more of the debridement methods to promote healing. Since 2006, debridement has been found to be advantageous in managing complex wounds.

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Debridement Methods

By the WoundSource Editors

A wound specialist’s job is to outline the options available for treatment. It is the patient’s job to choose a treatment option. Patients do not even have to select the best option. They must choose an option that works for them given their unique circumstances having a wound. When it comes to selecting debridement methods there are several options to choose from. This article will provide an overview of the most common debridement methods.

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Debridement

By the WoundSource Editors

In chronic wounds, debridement can be used to remove dead and necrotic tissue or to remove foreign material. Debridement has repeatedly been shown to expedite healing and is recognized as a critical element in wound care. There are several methods of debridement, some of which may or may not be the best option, depending on the health care setting, so practitioners should follow their individual state licensure boards’ professional scope and practice and the facilities’ policies when considering debridement.

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Wound Drainage

By Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Wound assessment is one of the initial steps in determining the plan of care, changes in treatment, and which key players should be involved in management. However, wound assessment needs to be accurately documented to paint a picture of what is truly happening with the wound.

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Temple University

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: Stem Cells Derived from Burned Skin – The Future of Burn Care
Authors: Saeid Amini-Nik; Reinhard Dolp; Gertraud Eylert; Andrea-Kaye Datu; Alexandra Parousis; Camille Blakeley; Marc G. Jeschke (Sunnybrook Research Institute, Canada)
Journal: EBioMedicine
Reviewed by: Akhil Korrapati, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Class of 2021, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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Venous Leg Ulcer

by Karen Bauer , NP-C, CWS

In my recent WoundSource webinar on management strategies of venous leg ulcers (VLU), I discussed the complex pathophysiology of VLUs and procedural interventions that can help them reach closure.

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Wound Assessment

By Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Throughout my career I have been lucky enough to be part of several nursing branches: home health, long-term care, acute care, long-term acute care hospital, hospice, and even a tuberculosis hospital; wounds have no limitations on where they will appear. As a passionate clinician, teaching, coaching, and mentoring have become a huge part of what I do, as is true for most clinicians. We are teachers, coaches, and mentors driven by passion and wanting to help and put in our “two clinical cents” or “stamp” on the industry.

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Support Surfaces for Special Populations

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 2 in a two-part series looking at the basics of correctly using support surfaces to help redistribute pressure. Read Part 1 here.

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Support Surfaces

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 1 in a two-part series looking at the basics of correctly using support surfaces to help redistribute pressure. Read Part 2 here.

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