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Karen Zulkowski's picture
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Part 3 in a series discussing the process of litigation in patient care lawsuits

For Part 1, Click Here
For Part 2, Click Here

by Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

Kathi Thimsen's picture

by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

In follow up to comments and additional considerations of products, ingredients, and clinical practice, it is important to discuss several aspects of the topic. This blog has served thus far as a primer for the evolution of products both on the market today and currently under development.

Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Ultrasound was successfully used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for years before its potential benefits in wound healing were first investigated. Ultrasound waves, formed when electrical energy is converted to sound waves at frequencies above the range of human hearing, are now routinely used in wound management, and can be transferred to tissue through a treatment applicator. The depth of penetration is dependent on the frequency, with higher frequencies resulting in lower tissue penetration.

Michael Miller's picture
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by Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 5

“Then if you got it, you don’t want it - seems to be the rule of thumb. Don’t be tricked by what you see, you got two ways to go.” Devo – Freedom of Choice

Glenda Motta's picture

by Glenda Motta RN, MPH

Recently, I attended the WOCN Mid-Atlantic Regional conference. There, a nurse attorney discussed strategies to limit liability and improve patient care. The Maryland Patient Safety Law requires that hospitals report all Level I events to the state Office of Health Care Quality (OHCQ). The penalties for failing to meet these requirements can include revocation of the hospital’s license or a fine of $500 per day.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
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by Aletha Tippett MD

We live in an evidence-based, evidence-seeking world. We want numbers and data for everything. But in the real world we live in, day to day with our patients, what do we use for evidence?