Blog logo

Blogs

Bloggers

Blog Categories

Thomas Serena's picture

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

I owe my humble thanks to GK Chesterton, the Christian apologist, for the title of this blog. In Chesterton’s book of the same title he observes that men have a strong tendency to cling to a deeply held belief despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.This is true as it applies to the current thinking surrounding hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

HBOT (Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy) has now been used for many years. Over the years we have seen HBOT used in treatment of many conditions such as various immune disorders, Lyme Disease, Autism, Stroke, Cancer, and the list goes on and on.

Kathi Thimsen's picture
Keywords: 

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Oliver S. is a resident in a nursing home. You have consulted on his case for management of perineal excoriation and rash. Your orders included the use of a cleanser and a skin protectant (both products are on the facility formulary).

Glenda Motta's picture
Keywords: 

By Glenda Motta RN, MPH

The most commonly used wound dressings are classified as medical devices. Examples of these include (but are not limited to): absorptive dressings, alginates, collagens, composites, contact layers, foams, gauzes, hydrocolloids, hydrogels, impregnated dressings, transparent films, wound fillers, and silver dressings.

Blog Category: 
Laurie Swezey's picture
Keywords: 

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Antimicrobial dressings have enjoyed a surge of popularity in recent years- there are now many dressing products on the market containing antimicrobials. However, just because they are available doesn’t mean they are the best choice for your patient. Let’s look at the use/purpose of these dressings, some of the types available and under what conditions they should and should not be used.

Blog Category: 
Diane Krasner's picture

By Diane Krasner PhD, RN, CWCN, CWS, MAPWCA, FAAN

Wound care clinicians who use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and legal professionals who review NPWT cases should all be focusing on the same standard of wound care issues when it comes to NPWT:

Laurie Swezey's picture
Keywords: 

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are numerous types of dermal lesions that may affect the skin. Dermal lesions may be classified as either primary or secondary lesions:

WoundSource Editors's picture
Keywords: 

By the WoundSource Editors

Neuropathic ulcers form as a result of peripheral neuropathy, typically in diabetic patients. Local paresthesias, or lack of sensation, over pressure points on the foot leads to extended microtrauma, breakdown of overlying tissue, and eventual ulceration. In addition, neuropathy can result in minor scrapes or cuts failing to be properly treated and eventually developing into ulcers.