Beth Hawkins Bradley's blog

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by Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

How often do you really consider the person that is attached to the wound you are treating? Do you take seriously those complaints, grunts, and grimaces that he sends your way when you remove drape and peel foam from a wound being treated with negative pressure? It isn’t pretty, but it is pretty important. I would love to hear what you think after you read and consider the content.

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Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture

by Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) has become standard of care for many wound types. Any clinician who works with NPWT dressings will report that a significant number of wounds will develop a malodor, commonly referred to as a “VAC stink.” In response to malodor, clinicians often opt to give the wound a NPWT holiday, which can delay wound closure. In thi article we will look at factors that contribute to malodor, and interventions that might reduce it.

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