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The Future of Wound Care

by Catherine Milne, APRN, MSN, ANP/ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Imagine yourself soaking up the sun on a tropical island. A subtle breeze from the swaying palm trees keeps you at the perfect temperature. In one hand you are holding a brightly colored drink with its obligatory umbrella garnish. The drink is non-alcoholic, of course, because you are working. In the other hand is a device that is monitoring your patient’s open wound and alerting you to changes in wound bed characteristics that must be acted on. You push a button to modulate the wound environment and return to the sounds of the crystal clear blue water lapping at your feet. Sounds nice, right?

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innovation

By Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, BC-ANP, CWOCN-AP

Our New England village has an annual tradition that takes place on the town green. These two acres of well-manicured grass have historically been central to the fabric of the hamlet. Every Memorial Day, members of the fifth grade class assemble on the steps of one of the town's oldest buildings to recite the Gettysburg Address. With parents, grandparents, and residents looking toward the cherub-faced innocents, they deliver, "Fourscore and seven years ago..."

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do the right thing

by Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, BC-ANP, CWOCN-AP

From Nike's "Just Do It" ad campaign to Google's corporate "Don't be evil" code, I've always been struck by the many marketing campaigns that remind us to pay attention to our conscience. A similar focus should apply to health care. In 2000, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published a scathing report showing that the number of people who died from medical errors surpassed the combined total of those who died from breast cancer and car accidents.1

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directions

by Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, BC-ANP, CWOCN-AP

My grandmother knew wound care. "Soak it in salt water," she'd say. "Keep it open to air!" she would emphatically declare the next day. You never knew what to expect. We've all heard the sage old dermatology advice "If it's wet, keep it dry, and if it's dry, keep it wet." Perhaps my grandmother was a guest lecturer at a dermatology conference and they were too intimidated not to incorporate her wisdom.

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by Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, BC-ANP, CWOCN

Editor's Note: This letter originally appeared in the print edition of WoundSource 2014.

There's a lot to be said about change, and much of what you say depends on which end of change you are on. Those of us who are early adopters of new products, technology or ideas get an adrenaline rush with just the hint of change. We love that feeling of freshness— finding the bumps in the road, meeting the challenges head on and solving the issues at hand. Then we help those who come after us—mentoring them over the hurdles we've overcome as the pioneers in a new territory. We are not early adopters, we are early adapters.

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