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By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

Some people choose the J-Pouch procedure rather than the traditional colostomy or ileostomy.

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By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

The "J-Pouch" is an example of an internal intestinal pouch constructed of small intestine. The surgery is performed as an alternative to a permanent ileostomy when the large intestine (colon) needs to be removed. The J-Pouch procedure can be performed in a I, II, or III stage surgical procedure. Although there are many complications associated with this procedure such as anal leakage after surgery, bowel obstruction, and pouchitis, there are many people that feel the J-Pouch procedure literally gave them their life back. Below is a comment from a J-Pouch patient:

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By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

A person with a colostomy has several options as to how they choose to manage their ostomy. The choice of which pouch is only the beginning when choosing the route they want to use to manage their stoma output. In this video, I will provide an overview of colostomy irrigation. For more resources on colostomy irrigation, see the UOAA website at www.ostomy.org . Other online groups and forums include “STOMACITY” or “COLONTOWN” on Facebook and www.meetanostomate.com.

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By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

The appearance of a new stoma on a patient’s abdomen can be shocking for the patient, family members, caregivers, and even some healthcare professionals. Stomas presented in textbooks, educational literature, and diagrams often appear round and “budded.” Patients will sometimes see images of other stomas and compare it to the appearance of their stoma. If their stoma is flush with the skin on the abdomen or retracted they may feel the surgeon did a poor job. Actually, the patient's body can have just as much to do with the appearance of the stoma as the surgeons surgical technique does.

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By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

Welcome to the third vlog in the series "GI Didn't Know That." In this video I will explain two more ostomy procedures: a "Loop Ostomy" and a "Double Barrel Ostomy." Both of these surgeries can be done as a temporary or permanent procedure.

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By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

There are various types of urinary diversions. One of the most common urinary diversions is the ileal conduit. The ileal conduit actually borrows a segment of bowel to create the stoma, causing the patient to undergo surgery on the GI tract as well as the urinary system. An ileal conduit is an incontinent urinary diversion and will require the use of an external pouch.

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By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

I am a visual learner. For me, watching a demonstration or viewing a photograph usually makes what I am trying to learn easier for me to understand. As a new blogger with OstomySource, I would like to bring in a more visual format, a vlog rather than a blog. I would like to begin with the ostomy basics by introducing detailed explanations of different ostomy procedures in a video series titled "GI Didn't Know That."

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