Kathi Thimsen's blog

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

The responses that I have been getting from the blogs are terrific! It is wonderful to know that clinicians are interested, questioning, and wanting to know what is in products. So, now in 2012, we continue this blog with the topic of products and practice.

I have been monitoring some web-based communities that are composed of clinicians, sales representatives, and consumers. I think that the consumer’s need and right to know is not only growing, but necessary for them in order to become self-advocates for quality healthcare.

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

In follow up to comments and additional considerations of products, ingredients, and clinical practice, it is important to discuss several aspects of the topic. This blog has served thus far as a primer for the evolution of products both on the market today and currently under development.

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Practicing skin and wound care requires the clinician to have many tools to address the myriad of issues related to patient management. Maintaining the integrity of a bandage, device, or skin edge all require operational understanding of the sticky aspect of wound care: adhesives.

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Hydrogel dressings were one of the first wound care products to change the practice of drying out wounds using caustic agents. Hydrogels drove home the advanced theory of Dr. George D. Winter, referred to as “moist wound healing.” Winter was the scientist that identified and validated the theory that by providing a moist wound environment, the outcomes for patients were those of faster healing and stronger regenerated wounds tissue, with less scarring and pain.

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Skin protectants and moisture barrier products serve two purposes in patient care: first is to protect the skin from harmful stimuli (incontinence, wound drainage, saliva, gastric juices, etc.); second is to create a barrier between the skin and the environment. It is amazing that one product and basically one classification of ingredient can get the job done!

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Looking for a moisturizer? Look no further than the faucet! Did you know that water is the ONLY moisturizing ingredient? It’s true. All of the other ingredients in popular skin and wound care moisturizers are simply to keep the water where we want it to be on our patient’s skin.

When selecting a moisturizing product for a patient’s condition, check the ingredients for agents that serve as humectants. This type of ingredient attracts, holds, and binds moisture to the skin.

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Cleansers for skin and wound care have always been a topic of much discussion. How and why do we use skin cleansers? What are the differences between skin cleansers and soap? Can you use a skin cleanser in a wound? Why not? What should you use for wound cleansing?

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Over The Counter (OTC) Drug Labels

Understanding how to read the label of an over the counter (OTC) drug is essential for safe and effective use. Many skin and wound care products are FDA approved by compliance to a specific monograph relating to a particular product type.

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Why do we have the FDA

In the late 1800s the government saw the potential danger that “snake oil” salesmen posed to society. Potions and elixirs were said to calm women prone to hysteria during the pre-menstrual cycle or cure headaches. Some of the most dangerous elixirs claimed to calm colicky babies and irritable children. These potions and elixirs were formulated with water, alcohol, and in some cases, poisons like toxic herbal extracts and tar.

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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Oliver S. is a resident in a nursing home. You have consulted on his case for management of perineal excoriation and rash. Your orders included the use of a cleanser and a skin protectant (both products are on the facility formulary).
Upon implementation of your orders, the resident complains of severe burning immediately following the application of the cleansing product. Rinsing relieves the complaint but immediately after the protectant is applied, the resident cries out with pain.

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