Lindsay Andronaco's blog

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patient centered care

by Lindsay Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Medicine changes constantly, and we must stay up to date on the best options for our patients. You're reading this because you want to be a better caretaker for the sick and injured - you want to be a better provider.

We should all strive to be better and know more.

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surgical wound bandage and drainage

by Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Wound exudate and how to properly assess and manage it has been a long standing clinical challenge in wound care. Assessing the exudate color, odor, volume, viscosity, and if it is causing maceration of the periwound skin are all important to note when creating a care plan for the patient. If there is not proper management of the exudate, then the high protease levels and low growth factor levels will negatively impact wound healing time.

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by Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Sudden hearing loss affects 5-20 individuals per 100,000, which equates to about 4,000 new cases each year in the U.S. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, or ISSHL, is spontaneous hearing loss in one or both ears with no apparent or known cause. This condition requires urgent medical attention.

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by Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Many people do not realize that the two most common issues we see in hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy patients are ear/barotraumas and a decrease in their blood glucose level. In general, HBO is very well tolerated and requires little other than a commitment to the treatment series.

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by Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Is your facility taking hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, or HAPUs, seriously? This has become a hot button issue for CMS over the last five years. I must say that I hear constant complaints about staffing issues and that is why the patient ended up with a HAPU. I can see how this may be one piece of the puzzle, but overall there are many other factors to why one gets a HAPU. From my experience as a wound care specialist and consultant, I feel that the reasoning for HAPUs is multifaceted.

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