Lydia Corum's blog

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By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Radiation necrosis can be defined as cell death as a result of high doses of radiation as used with aggressive tumors. The dead cells caused by the loss of blood flow can be located anywhere in line with the radiation treatments. This damage can cause wounds that will not heal, pain and skin that can be easily damaged. Radiation necrosis can be divided into the following classifications: acute, sub-acute and delayed complications. Acute damage is direct in-line damage as well as that in the surrounding area. The cells receive damage in the DNA structure enough to prevent mitosis. This damage does not last and can be treated by controlling the symptoms. Sub-acute damage is related to the treatment of lung cancer and mimics bronchitis. Another injury that can happen is related to temporary demylinization of the spinal cord and causes Lhermitte’s syndrome. With Lhermitte’s syndrome the patient suffers electric-like shocks in the legs when stretching the spine. Delayed injuries can happen from all types of treatments and from six months to many years after the initial treatment. This could also include acute injuries that were never resolved and became chronic injuries.

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By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

I recently wrote a blog on my proposal to remodel home health care. I continue my musings as we consider other ways we can incorporate consumer-based business and marketing practices into the health care arena. What has become very clear to me through my recent studies and professional experience is that there is an urgent need to continue with evidence-based care and quality care. One way for this to happen is for health care facilities to become specialized and to fill the unique needs of the community at large and then market that specialty.

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

At the start of December, I was looking at graduation from my Master's Degree program and the completion of my final paper. A capstone to the Master's program is much like the dissertation to the doctoral program. My journey has been long and along the way I have increased my base of knowledge. What I have learned on this journey will enhance my practical knowledge of wound care and patient care. I learned that health care must change, and we must look hard at how we are doing business and be willing to challenge the status quo. Health care needs highly knowledgeable leaders to assure patients receive quality care by being good stewards of the money given to promote that care. The provider must be educated to assure the patient's wishes are followed first and always.

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By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

In recent months, I have gained insight into a problem that appears to be universal across the continuum of care and across the country as I’ve worked in different facilities and in different capacities. I have found some people accepting of new information and others that feel they know it all and are unwilling to accept information from their professional peers. As those that know me well know, wound care is my passion. The only thing that hurts more than having a peer professional discount information is seeing the impact it can have on a patient and witnessing the resulting suffering - loss of limbs, loss of quality of life and loss of independence - all because the one making the wound care decisions couldn’t see beyond the end of their nose.

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By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

I have been thinking for awhile about what to do for this month’s blog. During the time I worked for CTI nutritional I realized that many wound care nurses, including myself, are not well trained in nutrition. I also noted the impact that nutrition has on patients and their quality of life.

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By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

I have heard some doctors and a number of other health care professionals talk about Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) and my sense is not many of them truly understand what it does or how it works. HBOT is not a television station and it is not what Michael Jackson used in an effort to preserve his youth. HBOT is a true way to help wounds heal and create new blood vessels that promote increased circulation. HBOT helps to promote angiogenesis, which is the rebuilding of blood vessels during wound healing. It also promotes increased neutrophils to help fight infection.

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By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

I am a Certified Wound Care Nurse (CWCN) and received my Certification with the Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse Association (WOCN). I will not say one certification is better than another, just do your homework and find one that challenges your knowledge. When I was working in the Wound Care Center, I started classes and education journey toward my certification. I had been working in Home Health Care as a wound care nurse and psychiatric nurse. This knowledge and experience gives me a different view of patients and wound care.

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