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Wound Assessment

By Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Throughout my career I have been lucky enough to be part of several nursing branches: home health, long-term care, acute care, long-term acute care hospital, hospice, and even a tuberculosis hospital; wounds have no limitations on where they will appear. As a passionate clinician, teaching, coaching, and mentoring have become a huge part of what I do, as is true for most clinicians. We are teachers, coaches, and mentors driven by passion and wanting to help and put in our “two clinical cents” or “stamp” on the industry.

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Biopsy of Atypical Wound

By Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Part 2 in a series discussing the etiology, assessment and management of atypical wounds. Read Part 1 here.

As our journey through the exciting and uncharted, choppy waters of atypical wounds comes to a close, I discuss a few more wounds. The purpose and goal of this blog are to create awareness of other wounds that exist and instill the curiosity in my fellow clinicians to get our research done.

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sickle cell anemia testing - atypical wound etiology assessment

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

Part 1 in a series discussing the etiology, assessment and management of atypical wounds.

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chronic wounds

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

What is a chronic wound? What changes must happen within a wound for clinicians to classify it as "chronic"? Is there a time frame for healing chronic wounds? And what should we clinicians do to prevent and/or reverse chronic wounds? These are all great questions that keep us on our toes, from the dedicated seasoned clinician to the clinicians new to our field. In this blog I will define what a chronic wound is, what it consists of, and whether there is a way to convert or reverse a wound.

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diabetic foot ulcer

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

Part 3 of a series discussing the assessment and management of lower extremity wounds For Part 1, click here. For Part 2, click here.

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Arterial Wounds

by Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

Part 2 of a series discussing the assessment and management of lower extremity wounds For Part 1, click here.

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venous assessment

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Part 1 of a series discussing the assessment and management of lower extremity wounds.

Wound clinicians across the nation (and the world) are commonly faced with the difficult task of managing lower extremity wounds. Lower extremity wounds come in many different forms. We are not faced with a generic type, but several—in fact, we never know what we'll be presented with day-to-day.

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barriers to wound healing

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

We hear this all too often, but it is so true: it takes a village to heal a wound. A village that's on the same page, with a thorough understanding of gaining progress and obtaining positive outcomes for the patient and removing the barriers to wound healing.

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anatomy of the skin, the body's largest organ

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

On our last encounter we discussed wound bed preparation and the TIME framework. What I wish to accomplish with this post is to make it easier to understand the skin, the changes it undergoes as we age, and pave the way for the phases of wound healing—all of which are essential in becoming a better clinician.

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