Samantha Kuplicki's blog

DMCA.com Protection Status
Samantha Kuplicki's picture
wound care supplies

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

In the last installment of my blog, we discussed a brief overview of billing for wound care products and dressings (durable medical equipment or DME) in several common care settings. Let's talk about the Hospital Outpatient Department (HOPD) a little more in-depth. Again, we will use Medicare as the standard for payment policy, as many payors use them as a model for policy-making.

Blog Category: 
Samantha Kuplicki's picture
Compass

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

It is becoming increasingly difficult to be involved in wound care at any level without having a working knowledge of the intricacies of varying policies regarding surgical dressings for wounds. Care setting, Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) for your geographic region and pertinent DME Local Coverage Determinations (LCD), type of dressings desired, and wound assessment are all factors that clinicians responsible for ordering supplies should be aware of. For practical purposes, we will mainly discuss Medicare as a reference for payors, as many commercial, contracted, and private payor policies are modeled after Medicare* policies.

Blog Category: 
Samantha Kuplicki's picture
Pain

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

The Patient Assessment
You've been asked to evaluate a patient for negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). It turns out they're a perfect candidate, so you start the process to have the unit placed immediately! The order is entered into the EHR for the recommended settings, and the initial dressing application is scheduled.

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
Arrows

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

After graduating with my BSN and passing the NCLEX, I was dead set on becoming the perfect ICU nurse. I am a very detail-oriented, meticulous, and organized person, which I had been told is great for the critical care environment. I had completed an externship in cardiac ICU in the spring before graduation, and felt I had an excellent chance of securing employment on that unit. I fit in with the team, the manager liked me, and I had begun to develop relationships with the physicians. After my interview, I was told I had not been selected for the position. I felt lost and defeated. I could not understand what I had done wrong.

Important Notice: The contents of the website such as text, graphics, images, and other materials contained on the website ("Content") are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The content is not intended to substitute manufacturer instructions. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or product usage. Refer to the Legal Notice for express terms of use.