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Patient Considerations

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound debridement is often necessary to address the underlying causes of chronic wounds, remove non-viable tissue, manage biofilm, and ultimately promote and expedite the healing process. There are multiple methods of debridement, including surgical/sharp, autolytic, mechanical, biological, enzymatic, ultrasonic, hydrosurgical, or synergistic (combination of debridement methods). Selecting the most appropriate methods of debridement is crucial in treating chronic and acute wounds successfully and optimizing the healing environment.

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Debridement

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound debridement is a crucial strategy for addressing some of the underlying causes of wound chronicity. The wound healing process can be impacted by chronic disease, vascular insufficiency, diabetes, neurological defects, nutritional deficiency, advanced age, and local factors such as pressure, infection, and edema. Debridement can expedite healing when used to remove necrotic tissue, other non-viable tissue, and foreign material. It can also be a tool to manage biofilm. Debridement exposes the viable underlying tissue, which promotes healing. There are several methods of debridement; determining the best option depends on the health care setting as well as the characteristics of the wound being treated.

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TIMERS

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound bed preparation is a well-established concept, and for many years the TIME framework – consisting of addressing Tissue Management, Inflammation and Infection, Moisture Balance, and Edge or Epithelial Advancement – was the standard tool used by clinicians to manage patients’ wounds throughout the wound care cycle.

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 Evidence-Based Product for Diabetic Foot Ulcer Management

By the WoundSource Editors

When determining the course of action for treating a given wound, it is important that wound care clinicians evaluate how advanced wound care therapies have been deemed evidence based and how the specific product technology works. Evidence-based advanced wound care products are required to be safe and effective based on epidemiology, etiology, and pathophysiology. However, safety and efficiency are not a 100% guarantee of effectiveness in clinical practice.

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Diabetic Foot Ulcer Care and Patient Support

By the WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) complications are challenging and costly. Evidence-based practice and advanced wound care technologies have the potential to maximize good outcomes and prevent ulcer recurrence, but ensuring that patients receive education on diabetes management and DFU prevention is also a vital step. Over time, people with unmanaged diabetes have increased chances of complications such as neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), chronic DFUs, infections, osteomyelitis, amputation, and even death.

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Advanced Therapies for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By the WoundSource Editors

Advanced wound care technologies have come a long way in treating chronic wounds. However, diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) can be challenging, and not every patient should have identical treatment. Utilizing a patient-centered approach is necessary for selecting appropriate treatments and achieving best possible outcomes. Understanding the specific patient’s needs and understanding the pathophysiology of diabetic wound chronicity are key elements in DFU management. The primary goal should be wound closure, while also preventing recurrence. To achieve both goals, clinicians must incorporate ongoing education and clinical support. Health care professionals should keep up on latest evidence-based research and practices to select the best advanced treatment for each patient.

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Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By the WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) continue to be a major problem, causing patient suffering, burden, infections, and high mortality. The cost of DFU treatment was estimated at $1.3 trillion globally in 2015. Despite evolving advanced wound care technologies through the years, DFUs continue to be among the most challenging chronic wound types.

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by the WoundSource Editors

ADA Diabetic Foot Risk Classification Table: A tool to help identify patient risk factors and urgency that includes priorities, indications, timelines, and suggested follow-ups.

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By the WoundSource Editors

Advanced Treatment Modalities: Wound care interventions that are typically applied when standard of care treatments have failed to lead to significant wound closure progress. Treatments include collagen products, cellular and/or tissue-based products, negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen, and others.

Cellular and/or Tissue-Based Products: Cellular and/or tissue-based products (CTPs) actively promote healing by stimulating the patient’s own cells to regenerate healthy tissue.

Collagen: Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body. In wound healing, collagen attracts fibroblasts and encourages the deposition of new collagen to the wound bed.

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The Inflammatory Phase of Wound Healing

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound healing is a complex biological process that involves a sequence of molecular and cellular events to restore damaged tissue. These events occur within the extracellular matrix, a complex three-dimensional acellular environment that is present within all tissue and essential for life. Remodeling within this extracellular matrix is necessary for tissue repair throughout the wound healing process, including during the inflammatory phase.

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