Cancer

Ivy Razmus's picture
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By Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has left many people with free time on their hands as other activities are cut to avoid exposure to the virus. What if we used this time during the pandemic to strengthen screening for cancers? When later-stage cancers are discovered, patients often undergo surgery with open wounds, new stomas, and other risk factors for infection. These wounds may require wound vacuum devices, complex dressing changes, increased nursing time, and in some cases an increased length of hospital stay. After discharge, these patients often require care in a skilled nursing facility to help them transition to home care. Can we prevent ostomies and wounds by making screening more accessible? Further, the diagnosis of cancer can lead to hospitalization and an increased need for adjuvant therapy such as chemotherapy or radiation, which weakens the immune system.

Janet Wolfson's picture
post-surgical cancer patient

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

So, if you are following my series on the lymphatic system, then recall that last month the topic was causes of lymphedema. Today I will dive into how modern medical care and disease processes can affect the lymphatic system

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
nursing issues and being a family caregiver

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

November marks the beginning of National Family Caregiver Month. Many of us are not only health care providers, but we are also family caregiver; some of us are part of the so-called sandwich generation. Caring for aging parents along with raising children can leave you feeling squeezed in the middle. While being a family caregiver can be incredibly rewarding, it can be a challenge physically, emotionally and financially. Caring for a loved one with a chronic wound can be especially daunting since the time, skill and dedication required can be overwhelming. This is especially true for family caregivers who suddenly find themselves needing to learn a multitude of health related skills.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Terri Kolenich's picture
creativity

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

We all have hobbies outside of what we do for a living. At least, we all should have hobbies or interests outside of our careers. Our hobbies are our outlet for stress. I love to draw. I also enjoy painting. What I love most of all is acting and theater. I love being on stage, performing, and getting an emotional response from my audience. Everyone that knows me well knows how much I love acting on stage. Bringing a script to life exhilarates me. Just the thought of performing live, delivering memorized lines, and anticipating the reaction of my fellow actors stirs and motivates me. Most of all I crave the opportunity to use my improvising skills when a scene goes an unexpected direction.

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