Education

Cheryl Carver's picture

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

A long-term care facility is paid thousands of dollars monthly to take care of our loved ones. This should assure us to feel a healthy sense of entitlement to quality of care. So why were there more than 2.5 million pressure ulcers reported by AHRQ in 2013? The cost of treating a single full-thickness pressure ulcer can now be estimated as high as $20,900 to $151,700. Pressure ulcers are not only exceedingly costly to treat, but prevention is by far cheaper. Yet, the economic impact is poorly recognized by many in the health service, as is the ability to make massive changes for a small investment.

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Michel Hermans's picture

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Merriam Webster defines bias as "selecting or encouraging one outcome or answer over others." The Cochrane handbook states: "The reliability of the results of a randomized trial depends on the extent to which potential sources of bias have been avoided."

When designing a trial or even animal research, avoiding bias is difficult. In fact, it may be introduced unknowingly or deliberately.

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Lindsay Andronaco's picture

by Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Is your facility taking hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, or HAPUs, seriously? This has become a hot button issue for CMS over the last five years. I must say that I hear constant complaints about staffing issues and that is why the patient ended up with a HAPU. I can see how this may be one piece of the puzzle, but overall there are many other factors to why one gets a HAPU. From my experience as a wound care specialist and consultant, I feel that the reasoning for HAPUs is multifaceted.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

During the past year, I have had the opportunity to collaborate with Dr. Steven Gale and a group of wound care specialists on the development of a standardized approach for treating chronic wounds, often considered the new global epidemic. The January 2014 issue of WOUNDS featured the strategy that organizes wound care using "wound warrior wisdom" to assist clinicians to DOMINATE wounds.1 The idea is to train "wound warriors" who will use this approach to treat and manage wounds in any setting, acute care, long-term care, wound clinics or home care.

Karen Zulkowski's picture

by Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

Back in 2012, I blogged about glove change frequency and hand washing during dressing changes. Your comments were very informative. It is sad that facilities are being cited for not changing gloves, and rewashing and sanitizing hands during a dressing change. There is no evidence this does anything but add to the cost. What's important is to protect yourself from the patient's bacteria.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

What? How can limb salvage be heartbreaking? Isn't it great to save a leg and a life? Of course, that is all wonderful and is what keeps you going in this very difficult field. What is heartbreaking is when you have worked so hard and are winning the game, only to have your patient swooped away by others and the limb is amputated without ever being contacted or consulted.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

Health care professionals recognize there seem to be 'seasons' for certain diseases and conditions. Spring and fall see a rise in flare ups of gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and seasonal allergies. Summer months bring an increase in traumatic events such as drownings, gunshot wounds and automobile accidents. Development of pressure ulcers does not follow a seasonal pattern—they occur at a higher than acceptable frequency throughout the year.

Cheryl Carver's picture

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

If you could trade places with one person for one day, who would it be? Your first thought may be an Olympian, celebrity, or even a superhero. Who wouldn't want to be awarded a gold medal, walk the red carpet, or wear a cape to soar above the big city? One thing remains certain, not one of us would choose to be one of our wound care patients. There is definitely nothing appealing about having a chronic wound.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

Happy Spring! At least that is what the calendar indicates, but recent temperatures across much of the US seem to dispute that fact.

I have been asked to list my 'Top 10' wound care resources for nurses. There are so many wonderful guidelines, books and journals relating to wound care it is very difficult to narrow down the number on my list. Instead of the 'Top 10' a la late night TV I was asked to write, with difficulty I was able to narrow the list down to an even dozen.

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