Geographic Factors

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

I hope this missive finds all of you safe and warm. For many, this has been an exceptionally brutal winter. Blizzards, ice storms, avalanches and a drought. All that is missing are zombie snowmen and a plague of locusts.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

There has been a very interesting and disheartening development in the past two years. My practice has always had a small private wound care clinic, and we have always been busy with referrals from local physicians. But lately those referrals have evaporated, the reason being that the local physicians have become part of larger hospital-based systems. So now if they have a wound they refer it to the hospital wound center that is a part of their system.

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Karen Zulkowski's picture

by Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

In my last blog, I talked about cultural beliefs affecting care. But there are geographic differences in North America that do also; for example, temperature. Temperature as a concept in the Chinese culture balances hot and cold illnesses with corresponding foods. However, in macro terms outside temperature also affects care.

Karen Zulkowski's picture

by Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

Five million US rural residents live in designated provider shortage areas. A provider shortage area is defined by the federal government as counties with fewer than 33 primary care physicians per 100,000 residents. It is believed this shortage will be worse by 2014. Not surprisingly, rural residents and primary care providers rate their health care lower than their urban counterparts. Few specialists are available in rural areas with rural areas having half the number of surgeons and other specialists compared to urban areas.

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