Health Care Economics

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

"Our food should be our medicine and our medicine should be our food."
-Hippocrates

This statement by Hippocrates rings true today as hospitals, rehabilitation centers and nursing homes strive to improve the quality of their meals. The day of “bland, cold, tasteless hospital food with limp vegetables and hard, dry meat” should be distant memory. When the meals and supplements served are not consumed, poor intake often results in weight loss and inadequate consumption of calories required for pressure ulcer prevention and healing.

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Sue Hull's picture

Part 3 in a series examining the reduction of facility costs and the continuation of quality care

For Part 1, Click Here
For Part 2, Click Here

By Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

After recognizing that wound care is expensive, North Mississippi Medical Center (NMMC) assessed the situation to discover possible reasons for why advanced wound care was costing so much. Then they standardized processes, education and products. So, the question is, what happened? Did they reduce costs? If so, did patient care suffer?

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Sue Hull's picture

Part 2 in a series examining the reduction of facility costs and the continuation of quality care

For Part 1, Click Here

By Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

After North Mississippi Medical Center (NMMC) identified advanced wound care as a costly service, observed that multiple wound care products were being used to perform the same clinical functions, and realized that evidence-based practice would be difficult to implement without standardization, they developed a strategy for change.

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Sue Hull's picture

Part 1 in a series examining the reduction of facility costs and the continuation of quality care

By Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Remember W. Edwards Deming? We all learned about him in business management, right? He taught and demonstrated that systematic approaches were necessary to improve quality and control costs. Maybe I’m the only one, but I couldn’t really grasp how that principle could be applied to wound care.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

The responses that I have been getting from the blogs are terrific! It is wonderful to know that clinicians are interested, questioning, and wanting to know what is in products. So, now in 2012, we continue this blog with the topic of products and practice.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 4

I willingly confess that I enjoy being a maverick. Of course, at age 52 with two cats, a wonderful wife of 27 years, and two daughters (this order in no way implies favoritism), that term seems to be a bit of a stretch. As a wound care clinician and scientist, I am always on the lookout to find that new innovative dressing, technique, or technology that will help my patients just a little bit more than the next guy. I believe the trade term for my type of psychosis is called “Early Adopter.” I prefer to think of myself in terms of the little kid we all knew who had to have the newest toy first.

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Glenda Motta's picture

By Glenda Motta RN, MPH

Coverage and payment for new wound care technology is never automatic, and demands skillful assessment of what various payers require to accept a new treatment modality. Reimbursement is complex and involves coding, coverage, and payment. Too many companies erroneously believe that “getting a code” guarantees payment. Nothing could be further from the truth!

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