Infected Wounds

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

We are supposed to check a wound every week and measure length, width and depth. These measurements should be getting smaller if the wound is healing, and we need to see improvement within two weeks, or have to consider that we need a different dressing on the wound. Of course, we also look at the type of tissue in the wound - granulation, slough, or necrosis - and the amount of drainage and odor. Those things can change our opinion about the wound. Maybe the wound measurements are not smaller but the wound has good granulation and shows signs of contraction - that wound is healing despite the measurements. Wound measurements can be very inaccurate. Often it depends on how the patient is positioned and who is doing the measurement. Even the same person taking measurements will not be the same every time.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

In considering this question as to whether amputation can be palliative, let’s keep clear that these are two separate subjects that sometimes interact. It is key to always keep our goals in mind. What is the goal in palliative care? The goals are to provide comfort, relieve pain, prevent infection, and improve or maintain quality of life. These goals are always to be in concert with the desires and wishes of the individual patient.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Part 3 in a series discussing nutritional status and diabetic foot ulcer risk.
To read Part 1, Click Here
To read Part 2, Click Here

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Although the standard treatment for infected wounds continues to include antimicrobial therapy, other therapies are gaining in popularity due to the rise in antibiotic resistance. This month's blog will explore some of these alternative therapies.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Microbiota are living organisms that coat the lining of the stomach, small intestine and the colon, which has the highest concentration. They serve as the front line of defense by protecting against incoming microbes, modulating the immune system, exerting anti-inflammatory activity and maintaining intestinal cell activity. While many factors disturb the intestinal microbiota such as age, stress, and poor hygiene, the wide spread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has led to the increase and severity of Clostridium difficile (C. diff). C. diff is a spore-forming bacterium that releases toxins in the intestine, causing mucosal inflammation, intestinal damage and diarrhea.

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