Infection Prevention

Hy-Tape International's picture
Preventing Cross-Infection

by Hy-Tape International

Infections are common and serious complications associated with post-surgical wounds. In wounds resulting from clean surgery, 8% become infected among the general population and 25% among those over 60 years of age. Preventing these infections can help reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and save lives. It is critical that health care professionals understand the risk of cross-contamination and take steps to prevent it.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
SSI

by the WoundSource Editors

Surgical site infections (SSIs) account for 20% of total documented infections each year and cost approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, morbidity, and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs.1,2

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Site Infections

by the WoundSource Editors

Of the millions of surgical procedures performed annually, most surgical site wounds heal without complications. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common complications that may occur after surgery, and that may delay healing, therefore increasing the cost of care.1

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Great news! Data suggest that surgical site infection (SSI) incidence could be halved with implementation of evidence-based interventions. So, why are interventions not ubiquitously utilized across health care institutions and SSIs not nearly eradicated?

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
preventing-surgical-site-infections

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Part 2 in a series exploring topics related to surgical site infections. For Part 1, click here.

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Lydia Meyers's picture
Bacteria culture

by Lydia A. Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Wound infections are discussed in the media and are a major reason for admission into the hospital. With the importance in health care today to decrease costs, I was encouraged to do research into where infections come from and the causes for hospitalization and death among wound patients. In the current data I found there is information showing how the government has increased surveillance related to reportable admission to hospital in relation to infections in wounds by home health and hospice organizations.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Nursing and Clean Wound Dressing Changes

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Hi blog buddies,
Matron Marley is taking a vacation to allow her writer (me) to vent. The problem I see has evolved since the introduction of a 'clean dressing technique' over the last 15 years or so, and has little foundation in the distant past when Matron wandered the wards instilling dread into unsuspecting students as she put them 'on the spot'. This problem is most definitely a current problem and it needs attention.