Infection Prevention

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
SSI

by the WoundSource Editors

Surgical site infections (SSIs) account for 20% of total documented infections each year and cost approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, morbidity, and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs. A 2008 estimate from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that diagnosis of SSI is associated with increases in hospital length of stay of up to one to two weeks and a risk of death nearing 10-fold that of patients without SSI. Although the sequelae and associated financial impact of SSI are dependent on multiple factors—including patients’ status before surgery, type of surgical procedure, and treatment of identified pathogen—annualized estimates have reached $10 billion.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Tetanus Immunization

by Aletha Tippett MD

Tetanus is a multisystem disease that occurs worldwide and is caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. This bacterium is present in feces and soil. Tetanus has been mostly eradicated in the United States because of childhood immunization; however, there have been reported cases among immigrants, as well as young adults who partake in higher-risk behaviors such as body piercing and tattooing and those who fail to maintain adult booster immunization. Other risk factors include diabetes or chronic wounds. It is fatal in approximately 10% to 30% of cases. Tetanus can be localized (with muscle contractions in the part of the body where the infection began) or generalized (affecting the entire body). Most reported tetanus cases are generalized.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Site Infections

by the WoundSource Editors

Of the millions of surgical procedures performed annually, most surgical site wounds heal without complications. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common complications that may occur after surgery, and that may delay healing, therefore increasing the cost of care.1

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Strategies for Infection Prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Effective wound management and the prevention of infection for patients with wounds are not only key to wound improvement, but also to avoiding a slide into a state of chronicity. Unfortunately, many wounds that start out simple turn into chronic wounds because of the complications associated with comorbid conditions and secondary infection. Approximately 6.7 million patients in the United States are affected by chronic wounds, and the pervasiveness of these wounds and their connection to other chronic illnesses are underappreciated. That said, estimates for treatment costs are in excess of $50 billion annually.1

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Hy-Tape International's picture
wound dressing securement - infection prevention

by Hy-Tape International

To promote rapid healing, improve patient comfort, and prevent complications, it is important that health care professionals actively work to prevent infection. One key component of that effort is wound dressing securement. Secure, gentle, and effective dressings can help prevent the ingress of foreign material, reduce damage during dressing changes, and help foster an ideal healing environment. This can help reduce the risk of infection, thereby improving patient outcomes and lowering costs. In this post, we explore the importance of infection prevention and effective dressing securement strategies to help prevent infection.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Great news! Data suggest that surgical site infection (SSI) incidence could be halved with implementation of evidence-based interventions. So, why are interventions not ubiquitously utilized across health care institutions and SSIs not nearly eradicated?

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
preventing-surgical-site-infections

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Identifying the presence of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) is an important, basic skill for the wound specialist, and even more essential is understanding how to apply evidence-based, risk-reducing interventions. SSIs are particularly problematic because of the multiple factors contributing to their development, including those that are directly patient-related (modifiable or non-modifiable), and non-patient related (facility, procedure, pre-op, intra-op, and post-op). Due to the multifaceted nature of SSIs, we must address specific issues simultaneously in order to successfully reduce the patient’s risk.

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Lydia Meyers's picture
Bacteria culture

by Lydia A. Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Wound infections are discussed in the media and are a major reason for admission into the hospital. With the importance in health care today to decrease costs, I was encouraged to do research into where infections come from and the causes for hospitalization and death among wound patients. In the current data I found there is information showing how the government has increased surveillance related to reportable admission to hospital in relation to infections in wounds by home health and hospice organizations.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Nursing and Clean Wound Dressing Changes

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Hi blog buddies,
Matron Marley is taking a vacation to allow her writer (me) to vent. The problem I see has evolved since the introduction of a 'clean dressing technique' over the last 15 years or so, and has little foundation in the distant past when Matron wandered the wards instilling dread into unsuspecting students as she put them 'on the spot'. This problem is most definitely a current problem and it needs attention.

Margaret Heale's picture

Perspective of Nursing Care from Past to Future by Matron Marley

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Hi blog buddies, Matron Marley here. I may be an ex-matron, but I may just have some gems for you. Today I would like to cast the threads (strings even) of time back to when I was a new nurse rather than a matron. The reason being the change happened then. I remembered it today when a rather frail lady caught her arm on a door mechanism. It tore such a huge triangle of her delicate skin, and my goodness did it bleed. I put on the gloves I keep in my pocket and pressed several napkins on it while the nurse went for supplies. She returned promptly with gloves, hand gel, gauze, skin prep, saline, cotton swabs, Xeroform, net and Steri-Strips™ (great invention, right up there with Velcro and cyanoacrylate).