Lydia Meyers

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black widow spider

by Lydia A. Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

In the times that I have worked with amazing hospitals and doctors, I have learned and gathered information on the differences between two types of necrotizing infections that happen in the world of wound care. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and spider bites can present as similar in nature and need immediate intervention.

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Bacteria culture

by Lydia A. Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Wound infections are discussed in the media and are a major reason for admission into the hospital. With the importance in health care today to decrease costs, I was encouraged to do research into where infections come from and the causes for hospitalization and death among wound patients. In the current data I found there is information showing how the government has increased surveillance related to reportable admission to hospital in relation to infections in wounds by home health and hospice organizations.

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by Lydia A. Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Today's health care changes are a necessity. Unfortunately, both the country's economy and overspending with abuse of the system contributed to this need for change. What are the predictions for the future? How can educated health care professionals prepare for the future and protect themselves? How will these changes affect wound care and wound care nurses? Within this blog, I will try to answer these questions with information gained from life, education, lifelong research, critical thinking, and looking outside of the box.

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

What is a wound care patient?

A wound care patient is a person with an open area that is not healing. I hear wound care patients referred to as: the pressure ulcer, the hip wounds, the one that has legs that always smell like urine, the amputee that is going to lose the other leg, the non-compliant with the chronic wound, the drug addict. Where in nursing did we lose that perspective of the person behind the disease or illness? These are people with wounds that require our best effort in order to heal. They need our loving care, our education, and our assurance that all will be well.

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a type of therapy that is oxygen done under greater than atmospheric pressure. Treatments are done according to approval by Medicare/Medicaid rules and regulations. At this time HBOT has been approved for the following:

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

There is a traveler coming to your hospital who will only be working for 13 weeks, eight weeks or however long the facility needs that nurse. As a nurse working in the hospital, how does working with this temporary staff member make you feel? What does the organization have in store for that nurse?

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Enterocutaneous Fistulae (ECF) are a major healthcare issue affecting patients, their lives and the healthcare system. ECF are defined as abnormal connections from one organ to another. The most serious condition is formation from an internal organ to the skin. According to an article by Willcutts, Scarano, & Eddins in 2005, 75% to 85% of all fistulas occur 7 to 10 days after surgery. ECF often develop as a result of the patient's medical condition, past radiation treatments in area, and malnutrition of the patient. The names of ECF are related to exit and entrance points. According to Baranoski & Ayello, 2012, the mortality rate for patients with ECF ranges from 12% to 25%. The mortality is the result of sepsis, malnutrition, and dehydration. The ECF patient faces several problems including: cost of supplies, control of exudate and quality of life issues for the patient.

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Diabetes is the number one cause of amputation for wound care patients. Individuals with diabetes need monitoring and education about the dangers they face on a daily basis due to their condition. Diabetic ulcers often begin with a simple bump, as a callous or by stepping on something.

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Radiation necrosis can be defined as cell death as a result of high doses of radiation as used with aggressive tumors. The dead cells caused by the loss of blood flow can be located anywhere in line with the radiation treatments. This damage can cause wounds that will not heal, pain and skin that can be easily damaged. Radiation necrosis can be divided into the following classifications: acute, sub-acute and delayed complications. Acute damage is direct in-line damage as well as that in the surrounding area. The cells receive damage in the DNA structure enough to prevent mitosis. This damage does not last and can be treated by controlling the symptoms. Sub-acute damage is related to the treatment of lung cancer and mimics bronchitis. Another injury that can happen is related to temporary demylinization of the spinal cord and causes Lhermitte’s syndrome. With Lhermitte’s syndrome the patient suffers electric-like shocks in the legs when stretching the spine. Delayed injuries can happen from all types of treatments and from six months to many years after the initial treatment. This could also include acute injuries that were never resolved and became chronic injuries.

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by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

I recently wrote a blog on my proposal to remodel home health care. I continue my musings as we consider other ways we can incorporate consumer-based business and marketing practices into the health care arena. What has become very clear to me through my recent studies and professional experience is that there is an urgent need to continue with evidence-based care and quality care. One way for this to happen is for health care facilities to become specialized and to fill the unique needs of the community at large and then market that specialty.

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