Martin Vera

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Wound Assessment

By Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Throughout my career I have been lucky enough to be part of several nursing branches: home health, long-term care, acute care, long-term acute care hospital, hospice, and even a tuberculosis hospital; wounds have no limitations on where they will appear. As a passionate clinician, teaching, coaching, and mentoring have become a huge part of what I do, as is true for most clinicians. We are teachers, coaches, and mentors driven by passion and wanting to help and put in our “two clinical cents” or “stamp” on the industry. I frequently converse with clinicians in my area, all part of SWAT (skin and wound assessment team), and talk about how it takes a village. I especially enjoy talking with my good friend and mentor Jesse Cantu, RN, BSN, CWS, FACCWS, who is a passionate clinician with a fire that gets you all excited—those who know him know what I am talking about.

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Biopsy of Atypical Wound

By Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

This blog describes a few atypical wounds, including scleroderma, Marjolin's ulcer, and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Even with the previous discussion of atypical wounds in this two-part series, many other atypical wounds exist, and I encourage and challenge you to educate yourselves and others, continue doing the research necessary to continue the battle to prevent and heal these wounds, and increase awareness to achieve early detection and have better chances for positive outcomes.

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chronic wounds

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

What is a chronic wound? What changes must happen within a wound for clinicians to classify it as "chronic"? Is there a time frame for healing chronic wounds? And what should we clinicians do to prevent and/or reverse chronic wounds? These are all great questions that keep us on our toes, from the dedicated seasoned clinician to the clinicians new to our field. In this blog I will define what a chronic wound is, what it consists of, and whether there is a way to convert or reverse a wound.

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diabetic foot ulcer

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

In this last of our three-part series on lower extremity wounds, we will focus our attention to diabetic foot/neuropathic ulcers. Research indicates that the United States national average for diabetes mellitus (DM) accounts for a little over 8% of the nation, or roughly over 18 million Americans afflicted with this disease—what the industry refers to "the silent killer" for the amount of damage it causes. DM has the capacity to affect vision and circulation, as well as increase the incidence of stroke and renal disease, just to name a few associated problems. Over 20% of individuals with diabetes will develop ulcerations, with a recurrence rate of over 50% for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) alone. Overall, lower extremity wounds have recurrence rate of 40-90%. We have our work cut out for us. So, let's put our deuces up, recognize early intervention, and try our best to manage and prevent complications associated with DM.

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Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS is the Coordinator of Wound Management at Patience Home Health Care in San Antonio, Texas. He has been working in the wound care field for nearly 20 years, helping countless patients, teaching wound care best practices, and improving standards at his care facility. His career has demonstrated an extraordinary passion for patient care, a commitment to doing the right thing, and a strong faith.

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venous assessment

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Wound clinicians across the nation (and the world) are commonly faced with the difficult task of managing lower extremity wounds. Lower extremity wounds come in many different forms. We are not faced with a generic type, but several—in fact, we never know what we'll be presented with day-to-day.

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wound healing

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

It is simply mind blowing how meticulous and intricate our bodies were created and how it responds through adversity and of course, simple wear and tear. When our body experiences injury and our skin gets altered or wounded, it starts a cascade of events within the body that masterfully react to the situation at hand and takes care of the damage, allowing the healing process begins

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anatomy of the skin, the body's largest organ

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

On our last encounter we discussed wound bed preparation and the TIME framework. What I wish to accomplish with this post is to make it easier to understand the skin, the changes it undergoes as we age, and pave the way for the phases of wound healing—all of which are essential in becoming a better clinician.

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wound healing and wound bed preparation

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Wound bed preparation has become the gold standard model for proper wound assessment. It allows us clinicians to identify and breakdown local barriers to wound healing. Throughout our health care careers, we have seen it over and over again: the collective emphasis on standards of care, evidence-based practice, and cost-effectiveness in order to achieve positive outcomes for our patients.The wound bed preparation model supports all of these aspects of care delivery.