Nursing Issues

Holly Hovan's picture
Interdisciplinary Journal Club

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Wound, ostomy, continence (WOC) nurses wear many hats. A significant role that we play is that of an educator, both with our patients and with our staff. I'm sure we've all heard "How on earth did you ever get interested in wounds? What made you want to be a wound specialist?" or similar comments. There are so many specialties in nursing, so why this one? For me, it is about helping others.

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Margaret Heale's picture
home care nurse with patient

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

I watched a short PowerPoint DVD on the "bag technique" as part of our regular in-servicing the other day. The presentation started with the most important way to prevent cross infection—wash hands—which is fine. Then came the bag technique. I have no problem with the fundamentals of keeping your bag off the floor, only getting anything out of it after decontaminating your hands, and wiping before you store. I do have a problem with having to place the bag on a Chux or water-resistant wipeable or disposable surface, however.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

In celebrating the 20th anniversary of WoundSource, we would like to acknowledge the support of our readership. The WoundSource Reader Profile Series shares the stories behind our readers and how WoundSource currently impacts their wound care practices.

Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse at Detroit Medical Center Huron Valley Sinai Hospital

Holly Hovan's picture
wound care education

by Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

As a wound, ostomy, and continence nurse in long-term care, education is a huge part of my role working in our Community Living Center (CLC), Hospice, and Transitional Care Unit (TCU). Unit specific, evidence-based training and continued follow-up are integral to the success of our pressure injury prevention program. The unit-based skin care nurses (UBSCNs) are at the frontline of prevention, along with all nursing staff, especially nursing assistants (NAs).

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Margaret Heale's picture
wound care terminology

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Looking back on a previous New England WOCN Society regional conference I attended, it strikes me that there where several impressive items discussed relating to the topic of pressure injuries.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
self-care for nurses

by Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

"Apply your own oxygen mask first."

We have all heard time and time again how important it is to take care of yourself first so you can take better care of others. It is impossible to give something you do not have. Nurses, by nature and training, care for others before caring for themselves. Taking care of yourself should be as important to you as caring for your patients. This life lesson is clearly presented by flight attendants before every take off. Let me explain.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
nutrition and health care clinicians

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics annually designates March as National Nutrition Month and the theme this year is Savor the Flavor of Eating Right. My blog usually focuses on what we as caregivers can do to improve the nutrition of our clients/patients with wounds. However, how often do you as a busy wound care clinician think about your nutrition or what you are eating or probably not eating?

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