Nutritional Supplements

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vitamin and mineral supplementation

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Last month I discussed the value of consuming a "balanced diet" versus taking mega doses of vitamins for wound healing. This month the focus is on minerals. Minerals are inorganic compounds that comprise 4% of body weight but are essential to metabolic function, tissue health and fluid balance.

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Fruits, Vegetables and Protiens

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

As we appreciate the glorious fall foliage, the crisp sunny days and marvel at the vibrant chrysanthemums in rich jewel tones, we also enjoy hearty meals and soups that incorporate seasonal vegetables. Food is a common, universal topic discussed while caring for clients with wounds. After all, everyone eats and has an opinion on what should be purchased and how meals should be prepared.

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Nutrition vs. Antibiotics

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

As Lydia Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN emphasized in her recent blog 4 Common Bacteria that Cause Infections in Wound Management, assessing the patient for infection is key to controlling the spread of infections. What role does nutrition play in controlling the adverse effects of antibiotic therapy?

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By Janis E. Harrison, RN, BSN, CWOCN, CFCN

Monday came with expectations of fixing the problem. It wasn't to be. Daryl was weak and hated the NG tube in his nose and throat. I arrived early at his bedside and waited for the doctor to let us know what the plan of action would be for the blockage problem. I left to use the public restroom and missed the doctor's visit. No one quite new what the plan was when I questioned the staff. So I created my own plan. I made Daryl get out of bed and started walking him in the halls throughout the entire hospital. I did not want him to get any weaker and I wanted to see if the mobility would increase the gastrointestinal motility. He was not happy with me at first but with education and the explanation of why, he was more than willing to try.

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By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Today an increasing number of individuals follow a vegetarian diet either by personal choice or for religious or cultural beliefs. Some research indicates that those who follow a plant-based vegetarian diet (50% of all protein in the diet) tend to be healthier than those who do not. There are several variations of the vegetarian diet from a semi-vegetarian or flexitarian to a strictly vegan diet. Years ago, dietitians were taught that it was critical to combine complementary protein sources using an exact pattern within a meal to achieve the required amount of amino acids. However, current research indicates that as long as the daily requirements are met, the body is able to combine amino acids as needed. The challenge is achieving requirements for individuals with wounds who are consuming vegetarian diets.

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By Janis E. Harrison, RN, BSN, CWOCN, CFCN

My Path to Becoming a Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurse

"What did I get myself into?" There were several times over the first 10 years of my 20 year marriage to a person with an ostomy that I had to ask myself that question. Then came the revelation of the old saying "if you can't beat 'em…. join 'em." I decided that after major problems my spouse had with several surgeries – which included ostomy revisions, fistulae, abscesses, and surgical wounds – I would need to learn much, much more if I was going to spend the rest of my life with my husband, Daryl, and his maladies.

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By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Building on the evidence that I have reviewed in the past several blogs concerning diagnosing adult malnutrition, this month we'll discuss some solutions for meeting energy and protein needs for elderly clients with pressure ulcers.

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By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

As the ethnic diversity in the United States continues to increase, clinicians should understand how food, culture and religious practices impact the nutrition interventions we recommend. According to the Census Bureau in 2010 Hispanics were the largest minority group in the US followed by African Americans and then Asians. Estimates are that by 2050 the minority population will reach 54% of the US population. The Hispanic population is anticipated to triple and the number of Asians will double.

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By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

In response to Dr. Michael Miller's February blog, I would like to educate readers on the role and responsibility of the registered dietitian (RD) on the wound care team. The RD's educational and professional requirements include completing a bachelor's degree in nutrition from an accredited university, completing an accredited supervised practice program (usually 12 months) and passing the national examination to become a registered dietitian with the Commission on Dietetic Registration. All registered dietitians must maintain continuing professional educational requirements. Many RDs have a master's degree and/or have completed additional certifications in specialized areas of practice, such as certification for nutrition support (CNSD). The alphabet soup of letters for RDs is no different than the multiple initials behind many other professionals' names, including Dr. Miller's. Sorry, there is no secret handshake. Certification and licensure are state dependent just as in other health care professions. Dietetic registration and state licensure requirements also define scope of practice and define continuing education requirements. My own practice includes both the state of Indiana where I am certified to practice, and the state of Illinois, where I am licensed to practice.

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By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The NPUAP/EPUAP Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Treatment Guidelines published in 2009 have been widely circulated around the globe and translated into 17 languages. Successful implementation of any guideline requires a "buy-in" by all the members on the interprofessional team. As a member of the wound care team at a long-term care facility, I participate in weekly wound care rounds. Prior to our meeting, the wound care nurse has measured the wounds and documented them on an information sheet that also includes the type of wound (pressure vs. circulatory etc.) plus support surfaces and nutrition interventions.

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