Ostomy Management

Hy-Tape International's picture
Ostomy Care Supplies

by Hy-Tape International

Ostomy surgery is an increasingly common treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. With over 450,000 people with stomas in the United States and 120,000 new ostomy surgical procedures performed each year, a growing number of patients must contend with the difficulties of stoma management. However, with guidance from a health care professional, stoma patients can live healthy, active lives while minimizing their risk of injury, infection, and other problems.1

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Holly Hovan's picture
peroperative ostomy siting

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

When marking a patient for a stoma, it is important to consider the practice based on evidence acquired by the wound, ostomy and continence (WOC) nurse during training and experience. Stoma siting procedures are based on evidence-based practices:

Hy-Tape International's picture
preventative skin care - ostomy management

by Hy-Tape International

Prevention is one of the most important components of wound and ostomy care. Factors such as hydration, pressure, excessive moisture, cleanliness, and erythema can all affect wound healing rate, patient comfort, and the incidence of new wounds. By taking a proactive stance, health care professionals can reduce the risk of infection, reduce costs, and improve patient outcomes.1

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Diana Gallagher's picture
ostomy care 101

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

In order to teach patients, it is important to have some basic knowledge about ostomies. Sadly, as I shared last month, the majority of nursing students learn very little about ostomies or ostomy management. Most nurses have a good understanding of basic anatomy and physiology so this is not the focus of this blog. Instead, we are going to focus our attention on basic information that every nurse should know and competencies that every nurse should develop in order to provide quality care to their patients.

Diana Gallagher's picture
Ostomy

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

As a CWOCN® (Certified Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse), I have always been surprised that not everyone shared my passion about caring for and about ostomy patients. Ostomy management is one of my chosen specialties. Parents love each of their children and should not have a favorite. Managing multiple specialties is a lot like being a parent. I love each of my specialties for different reasons but, if I were forced to choose only one, caring for ostomy patients would be the winner.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

I was fascinated by the incredible amount of money that was donated to various organizations on December 2nd – the day declared as a National Day of Giving. This movement started in 2012 by the 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation as a response to the commercialization of Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
marathon liquid skin protectant

By Peter Smith and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Marathon® Liquid Skin Protectant by Medline Industries, Inc. is a versatile non-stinging barrier film that provides protection for at-risk skin or damaged skin. Marathon® comes in single use applicator tubes that have a built-in sponge tip. Each tube contains enough liquid skin protectant to cover an area of 10cm. The barrier film created is breathable, flexible and durable relative to other liquid skin products.

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Diana Gallagher's picture

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

I frequently write about the value and rewards of being a WOCNCB® certified nurse. It is an amazing job that allows me to save limbs and change lives on a daily basis. After decades of working in acute and outpatient care, I now work as an independent consultant. I teach, I write, and I see patients on a daily basis. Where I live, we currently do not have a single home health agency that employs a Certified Wound and Ostomy Nurse (CWOCN®). Routine wound and ostomy care can be easily managed but when there are those challenging patients with difficult wounds or unusual ostomies, there is a clear need for the care of a CWOCN.

Janis Harrison's picture

B Janis E. Harrison, RN, BSN, CWOCN, CFCN

My husband was insistent that I go home the first night he was on the surgical floor. He had a roommate, therefore the hospital policy forbade me to stay the night with him.

Janis Harrison's picture

By Janis E. Harrison, RN, BSN, CWOCN, CFCN

My husband Daryl had gone in to a same-day surgery center for incisional hernia repair and possible "tummy tuck" after losing 85 pounds. We had searched for a good surgeon and opinions on any complications that might need to be considered, since Daryl had an ileostomy. We discussed whether or not mesh should be used, infection possibilities, and if he should have the skin tucked that was now loose from weight loss. One surgeon was not sure he wanted to tackle the task and possible complications. Another surgeon just said "sure, I can do that." Well, of course we wanted a competent surgeon; one with confidence and a little arrogance, but then, this was just a "simple" incisional hernia repair, right? WRONG!