Patient-Centered

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Tissue Debridement

By the WoundSource Editors

The concept of wound bed preparation has been utilized and accepted for over two decades. Wound bed preparation techniques can only be accurately employed after a thorough and complete assessment of the wound. Poor assessments result in a negative impact of needless costs and truancy of appropriate treatments and outcomes. The goal of wound bed preparation is to provide an optimal wound healing environment. Up-to-date research in molecular science has helped evolve new technology and advanced therapies that include growth factors, growing cells in vitro, and developing bioengineered tissue. Researchers now know that the healing process involves an array of elements that require monitoring and attentiveness.

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Emily Greenstein's picture
Patient-Centered Wound Care

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON

Recently I was able to attend the Spring Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) in San Antonio, Texas. I attended many different lectures, presented, and sat on a few expert panels. The one recurring theme that kept echoing was the need to look at the whole picture. Often, as wound specialists, we get in the habit of looking just at the wound without taking into consideration the underlying comorbidities and potential causes of the wound in the first place. This got me thinking, how do I treat a new patient who comes into my wound center? I decided to put together the top five "tips" to remember to look at the whole patient, not just the hole in the patient (as originally stated by Dr. Carrie Sussman, DPT, PT).

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Christine Miller's picture
Coordination of Care

By Christine Miller, DPM, DMM, PhD, FACCWS

One of the gratifying aspects of being a wound care physician is the ability to develop such rich relationships with our patients. The frequent and consistent contact with the same provider lays a strong foundation of open communication and trust. I work in an urban safety net hospital’s ambulatory care center, which sees a high volume of high-acuity patients. It is not uncommon for me to see patients with venous leg ulcerations with concomitant uncontrolled hypertension or diabetic foot ulcerations secondary to uncontrolled blood glucose levels. Patient education is a vital part of my clinical encounters, particularly focusing on the systemic nature of wound healing. I always emphasize that while we are treating your wound, it is the full body well-being that is needed for ultimate success.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
Patient-Centered Communication

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Last spring, I encountered that specific type of patient we sometimes meet, the one who has been through the chronic wound care revolving door so many times that he or she sets out on his or her own path and refuses any byways diverting from it.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

As many as one-quarter to one-third of adults are living with incontinence. Risk factors include: age, obesity, childbirth, and prostate enlargement. Not being able to control leaking urine is embarrassing and can even cause people to limit daily activities and prevent them from enjoying life. Here are some ways medical professionals can support patients living with incontinence.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Wound Research Data Review Including Outliers

by Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

The research lecturer's name was Terry, and he had my respect and attention. Many of the students were dreading the research modules but were cheered by the prospect of Terry taking us through it.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
doctor giving patient hope

by Aletha Tippett MD

I have written about so many things over the past years… Maybe now is a good time to announce that I am writing a book called Hear Our Cry, an autobiographical story about 20 years of wound care and limb salvage. The process has had quite an impact on me, reviewing all the pictures and notes from my wound patients from the past two decades.