Patient-Centered

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Patient Centered Risk Assessment

by the WoundSource Editors

The goal of pressure injury/ulcer prevention is not only to maintain skin integrity but also to provide a patient-centered plan of care geared toward positive outcomes. This includes seeing your patient as a person, as well as identifying the patient’s pressure injury risks. Caregivers of any kind should learn to take steps in the prevention of pressure injuries/ulcers. We can utilize every risk assessment and tool known, but without educating our patients, health care professionals, and caregivers, a prevention program will not be successful. And let’s not forget that pressure injuries/ulcers can occur in patients of any age, at any weight, and in any type of setting. Most people think nursing homes are to blame when they hear the terms pressure ulcer, pressure injury, sore, decubitus, and bedsore. As clinicians, we tend to focus on the patient groups we take care of. Pressure injuries/ulcers are, most of the time, preventable.

Janet Wolfson's picture
Patient-Centered Communication

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Last spring, I encountered that specific type of patient we sometimes meet, the one who has been through the chronic wound care revolving door so many times that he or she sets out on his or her own path and refuses any byways diverting from it.

Ms. A had stage 3 lymphedema after a left knee replacement opened the hidden trap door of undiagnosed lymphedema several years before her admission to our inpatient rehab facility. Her reason for admission was debility from urinary tract infection (UTI). Comorbidities of obesity, severe arthritis of the right knee, diabetes, and chronic lymphedema wounds on both legs were exacerbating factors making discharge home difficult from the acute hospital.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

As many as one-quarter to one-third of adults are living with incontinence. Risk factors include: age, obesity, childbirth, and prostate enlargement. Not being able to control leaking urine is embarrassing and can even cause people to limit daily activities and prevent them from enjoying life. Here are some ways medical professionals can support patients living with incontinence.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Socioeconomic Considerations When Choosing a Wound Dressing

by the WoundSource Editors

As wound care clinicians, we need to take into consideration many different factors in deciding on a treatment plan for our wound patients. Our patients should be evaluated on an individual basis. If we look at our patient’s socioeconomic status, we will find it varies from patient to patient Socioeconomic status clearly affects morbidity and mortality rates related to wounds. Wound management tends to be lower in quality and follow-up visits tend to be fewer in number when compared with patients with better economic status.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Wound Research Data Review Including Outliers

by Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

When looking at randomized controlled trials one of the first things you read is a one liner, "subjects were matched," and there may be a list that includes stage of pressure injury, size of wound, age, sex, and a myriad of other things somebody decided to include. There may also be exclusion criteria such as uncontrolled blood sugar, obesity, and being over 60 years old. It makes sense to do this, and there is no doubt that once you have got homogenous groups and compare the outcome of one with another, after whatever intervention you wish to discover the worth of, the result may look gratifyingly convincing.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
doctor giving patient hope

by Aletha Tippett MD

I have written about so many things over the past years… Maybe now is a good time to announce that I am writing a book called Hear Our Cry, an autobiographical story about 20 years of wound care and limb salvage. The process has had quite an impact on me, reviewing all the pictures and notes from my wound patients from the past two decades.

Janet Wolfson's picture
patient interview questions

by Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

I was recently listening to one of my favorite news sources, NPR, enjoying an interview with James E. Ryan, the author of "Wait, What? - and Life's Other Essential Questions". The premise was that asking the right questions can lead to a happier and more successful life. A physician called in to relate that this was something he had been doing in his medical practice. I couldn't have agreed more – the questions I ask my patients (and then listening to their answers) can go a long way toward making an intervention in their health care more successful.

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Lindsay Andronaco's picture
patient centered care

by Lindsay Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Medicine changes constantly, and we must stay up to date on the best options for our patients. However, being "better" doesn't always mean reading articles or attending national conferences. We can often become better wound care providers just by being present and taking a few minutes to actually listen to the patient, read the situation, and show compassion.

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Michel Hermans's picture
Medication

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Undertreatment of medical issues is not necessarily bad: palliative care usually only treats symptoms but not the underlying cause of the symptoms which, if the patient wants this, is very appropriate. Remember, Hippocrates said something about suffering and while a disease may be not curable, suffering quite often may be treated with proper medication or other interventions (though, unfortunately, this is not always the case). We should not be worried to give somebody with terminal illness and in serious pain the proper type and amount of medication, even if there is a chance the patient would get addicted.

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Bruce Ruben's picture
writing online review

By Robert Striks, Special Writer, Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine

I know, I know. You can get more bees with honey than vinegar. If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say it. If you want to be happy, give up your need to be right.

But all those adages were created before the Internet. In those good old days, if you were an unsatisfied patient, you either confronted the doctor or the staff personally, or you switched doctors.