Patient Education

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Venous Leg Ulcer Management Strategies

by the WoundSource Editors

Venous leg ulcers can be painful, cause distress, and affect quality of life, from the weekly wound center visits, multilayer wraps, debridements, compression hose, elevation of legs above the heart, to the odor from heavy exudate.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Palliative Care

by the WoundSource Editors

Palliative care and hospice care are not the same, but they both share one goal. They both focus on a patient's physical, mental, social, and spiritual needs. Palliative care can begin at diagnosis and treatment or for patients at any stage of their illness. Patients may not want to receive aggressive treatment of non-healing wounds because of underlying diseases, pain, and/or cost.

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Cathy Wogamon-Harmon's picture
Veteran with Spinal Cord Injury

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

Immobility and decreased sensation can cause major problems related to the skin in the patient with spinal cord injury. Even though the average age of the veteran with a spinal cord injury is increasing, there are still many younger veterans affected by spinal cord injuries. When skin issues arise in this population, the impact is not only physical but also emotional as skin issues sometimes make it difficult for the veteran to remain in their chairs, thereby decreasing mobility and socialization.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Ostomy Care Supplies

by Hy-Tape International

Ostomy surgery is an increasingly common treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. With over 450,000 people with stomas in the United States and 120,000 new ostomy surgical procedures performed each year, a growing number of patients must contend with the difficulties of stoma management. However, with guidance from a health care professional, stoma patients can live healthy, active lives while minimizing their risk of injury, infection, and other problems.1

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Janet Wolfson's picture
evaluating medical information resources

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

It is hard to read a newspaper (my preferred news source) or an online news site without discovering false information. I recently read an NPR article about how to vet news yourself and how to recognize this.1 The vulnerability I felt made me think about protecting my decisions from this reporting and even more, how I can help my patients weed out fake reports.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Patient and Provider

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

As summer gives way to fall, one of the first thoughts most of us have is back to school. Patients and caregivers often feel as though every day is the first day of school and they are being asked to take the final exam before they have learned anything. Learner readiness is the cornerstone of an effective teaching/learning process.

Diana Gallagher's picture
ostomy care 101

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

In order to teach patients, it is important to have some basic knowledge about ostomies. Sadly, as I shared last month, the majority of nursing students learn very little about ostomies or ostomy management. Most nurses have a good understanding of basic anatomy and physiology so this is not the focus of this blog. Instead, we are going to focus our attention on basic information that every nurse should know and competencies that every nurse should develop in order to provide quality care to their patients.